Education

Education news

Erica Gibson / WBAA News

Purdue President Mitch Daniels will make almost 99 percent of the possible pay he could have been granted for the 2016 fiscal year, even though as much as $210,000 of it was said to have been “at-risk.”

The Trustees gave Daniels almost $202,000 of that $210,000. That’s on top of his $420,000 base salary and a $100,000 bonus for staying in the job through June 30th of this year.

All told, that means Daniels will earn almost $722,000 of a possible $730,000.

Claire McInerny / IPBS

The ISTEP panel that is developing a legislative recommendation for how to replace the state’s testing system heard from a slew of national testing experts Tuesday, who make the most specific suggestions to date.

Benjamin Chun / HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/BENCHUN/

The Department of Education will release 2016 ISTEP data in the coming weeks before calculating A-F grades for schools.

Schools and parents received individual student ISTEP scores back in August, but they were embargoed. Now, the Department of Education is putting together the scores to show data at the school, district and state level.

State superintendent Glenda Ritz says statewide data will be made public in the next month.

PunchingJudy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/punchingjudy/1934879517

Bartholomew County school officials say a student overdosed on opioids Monday morning at Columbus East High School in an attempted suicide. A resource officer was able to revive the student with naloxone. School officials now say they plan to increase access to the overdose antidote.

Last spring, four Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation schools received doses of the overdose intervention drug.

Eric Weddle/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University officials joined Indianapolis school and city leaders Monday to launch a new STEM-focused charter high school set to open next year.

It’s a unique curriculum where graduates who meet Purdue's admission requirements will be a top choice for enrollment.

But as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Eric Weddle reports, some worry the school could be a drain on the Indianapolis Public Schools District.

vozach1234 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/126640961

A group of Purdue professors is getting ready to study whether grades have risen artificially in the last 30 years.

Agriculture professor Levon Esters and math professor Ralph Kaufmann, agree with President Mitch Daniels that the issue deserves consideration if Purdue wants to maintain a reputation for rigor.

“If you have a Purdue education, it means something. If you got an A here, it means something,” Kaufmann says. “It’s not like at other Universities where 40-percent of the grades are A’s, so it doesn’t mean that much.”

Rachel Morello/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A pre-K advocacy group made up of Indiana businesses and philanthropic organizations asked a group of legislators on Wednesday to give more funding to pre-K scholarships for low-income families, and legislators pushed back.

The advocacy group, which includes representatives from United Way, Eli Lilly and PNC Bank, among others, testified before the interim study committee on fiscal policy.  The committee will have influence over what is included in the state budget when the General Assembly convenes in January.

Claire McInerny/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Latasha Marshall waits for a cab. She sits in the lobby of a Hilton Garden Inn, which serves as her living room this week.

The Environmental Protection Agency put her up for the week so the agency can deep clean her home; it tested for high levels of lead.

"The other night when we first got here, I went to sleep and I woke up and I was at ease,” Marshall says. “I haven’t been sleeping like that at home."

Once it’s clean, she can return with her daughters, ages 11, 16 and 17, but not to stay.

Peter Balonon-Rosen, Indiana Public Broadcasting

Public schools in Indiana serve about 2,400 students who are deaf or hard of hearing. Of those students a growing number now use cochlear implants, small medical devices that stimulate nerves in the inner ear and give a sense of hearing.

As technology develops, and cochlear implants become more common, many public schools are still working to catch up.

East Chicago School Receives Disaster Relief Loan

Sep 15, 2016
Claire McInerny

State officials have loaned the school district $3 million to support its response to the ongoing lead contamination crisis.

East Chicago’s Carrie Gosch elementary school sits next to soil that contains staggering levels of lead. That’s a major health threat that can harm children’s brain development.

So, as a safety measure, district officials moved about 450 elementary students to an abandoned middle school across – and rushed to renovate it before school began.

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