Education

Education news

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In an election year that’s been frustrating for so many, students at Lafayette’s Jefferson High School marched to the polls Tuesday with a sense of forward-looking optimism.

The day dawned rainy, but it had let up by the time the first group of Jeff High students walked across 18th Street to the county fairgrounds around 8:15 a.m.

Some of these students, who are studying government and American history, have turned 18 in time to vote for the first time.

Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

School districts around the state, including Clinton Central, are posing nine different referenda on ballots.

These ballot measures are becoming an important part of school funding.

School referenda became a common practice after 2008, when the legislature put caps on the amount of property taxes that could be collected.

Because property taxes were a huge revenue stream for school districts, many schools were put in a tough place financially.

Lafayette School Corporation

The Lafayette School Corporation on Wednesday announced plans to turn the former Lafayette Life Insurance building into a career academy for high school students.

Superintendent Les Huddle says next week the school board is slated to vote on a $2 million contract to buy the 94-thousand square foot building that has been vacant since the insurance company headquarters moved to Cincinnati, Ohio in 2011.

Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

This is a two-part series looking at the candidates for Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction.  

The state superintendent runs the Department of Education and chairs the State Board of Education.

 GLENDA RITZ

When Democrat incumbent Glenda Ritz first ran for state superintendent in 2012, she was the underdog.

She faced Republican incumbent and school reform advocate Tony Bennett. He praised charter schools, supported the creation of the voucher program and new ways to hold teachers and schools accountable for low test scores.

WFIU / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/

The Department of Education announced Monday the number of new teachers receiving licenses from the state saw a huge increase this school year. 

Last school year, the Department issued around 3,800 licenses to new teachers, the lowest of the last six years. This school year, around 4,500 were issued- an 18-percent increase.

That's a sharp turnaround. Recently there have been fewer people applying for new teacher licenses – the number has been dropping each year for the last three years.

Warsaw Community Schools / https://www.flickr.com/photos/95469015@N02/8707445809

A group of superintendents from around the state has written a letter this week criticizing the way the process of re-writing the state assessment has been handles.

The Indiana Urban Schools Association issued the letter, which is aimed at legislatures and the state’s ISTEP panel. The panel, created during the 2016 General Assembly, charged a group of educators, parents and state policy makers to create a recommendation for how to replace the ISTEP.

Richard Lee / https://www.flickr.com/photos/70109407@N00/

A group of Indiana University researchers has released a report comparing the mechanics of school voucher programs in a handful of states, including Indiana. 

IU's Center for Evaluation and Education Policy wanted to compare the school voucher programs in Indiana, The District of Columbia, Arizona, Louisiana, Ohio and Wisconsin – all places where any student that meets an income requirement can receive a state voucher.

A school voucher gives state money to a low-income student to pay for private school tuition.

Owen Parrish / https://www.flickr.com/photos/oparrish/3601673876

Top Indiana University administrators say a long-term efficiency initiative is unlikely to result in faculty or staff downsizing.  

The project, part of the university’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan, is called the Presidential Initiative to Reduce Administrative Barriers to Academic Excellence.

Vice President for Research Fred Cate says large organizations tend to accumulate layers of administrative red tape that can make it difficult to work efficiently.

A committee, made up of seven people including Cate, will spend the next few years on the project.

Inside A Dual-Language Preschool For Migrant Workers' Children

Oct 19, 2016
Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Depending on the season, Indiana farms employ between 2,000 and 20,000 migrant farm workers. When workers migrate, often their families do, too.

Children in this mobile lifestyle can face interrupted schooling, cultural and language barriers, and social isolation — factors that inhibit a child’s ability to do well in school.

High School Grad Rates Up Nationally, Down In Indiana

Oct 18, 2016
Dave Herholz / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dherholz/

Federal officials announced this week the national high school graduation rate reached an all-time high of 83-percent for the 2014-2015 school year.

But while the rate is up nationally, Indiana’s graduation rate decreased for the first time since 2010.

During the 2013–2014 school year, Indiana’s four-year high school graduation rate was 87.9 percent. One year later, during the 2014-15 school year, the graduation rate is down to 87.1 percent.

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