Education

Education news

Indiana lags far behind other states in providing families access to state-funded pre-K programs, according to a new study of Indiana’s pre-K offerings. The analysis finds Indiana, the only state that ties a family’s pre-K eligibility to work and education requirements, limits participation for children who may be most in need.

McCormick Responds To New Federal Graduation Rate Requirements

Jul 12, 2017

A new federal education law would make thousands of diplomas known as general diplomas no longer count toward a school’s graduation rate. It’s a move that Indiana’s schools chief says “blindsided” the state.

“Obviously the state recognizes those diplomas, employers are recognizing those diplomas,” says Jennifer McCormick, Indiana superintendent of public instruction. “This will just make it more problematic.”

If college students want a better chance at getting As in their classes, new research says setting goals at the beginning of the semester increases the opportunity to earn better grades.

Victoria Prowse is an associate professor of economics at Purdue University and helped conduct research on how goal setting affected the grades of college students. The study worked with 4,000 students at a large, public university, all taking a required class.

Arconic / Facebook

The Arconic Foundation hopes a recent donation to Ivy Tech Community College's Lafayette campus will help address the skills gap facing the manufacturing industry.

The college plans to use its $100,000 grant to start a new 3-D printing course and buy two 3-D printers. The school also plans to purchase laser cutters and engravers, all to be housed in a new lab space.

Ivy Tech Lafayette vice chancellor Todd Roswarski says he expects the program to simulate real-world experience.

Indiana To Change How It Calculates Graduation Rates

Jul 7, 2017

Indiana’s general diploma will no longer be considered when calculating school and district graduation rates, state officials announced Friday.

In a memo to principals and superintendents, the state said it will also no longer count students who earn general diplomas in the state’s A-F rating system.

How Indiana Gives School A-F Grades Is Changing

Jul 3, 2017

The state will now consider chronic absenteeism and how non-native speakers are learning English when calculating school A-F grades.

These two changes come as part of the Department of Education’s draft plan for how the state will comply with the new federal Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), which replaces the old No Child Left Behind law.

High School Job Training Takes On New Life In Indiana

Jul 3, 2017

What’s the point of high school? To get students ready for college or the workforce?

For years, Indiana officials have gone back and forth.

“Indiana has tended to shift one way and say ‘everyone needs a four year degree’ and then we shift the other way and say ‘we just need technical certifications,’” says Molly Deuberry, Indiana Department of Education spokesperson. “Really, the truth is in the middle, we need a great mix of all of those things.”

A proposal to remake secondary education at Indianapolis Public Schools will leave only four high schools near the city center, out of seven county-wide, and give students the choice to attend one of more than 12 career-focused programs divided among the remaining schools.

courtesy Purdue University

Though Purdue officials have bowed in recent years to faculty criticism that many international students aren’t qualified or prepared to come to school in West Lafayette, a pair of graduates from China have started a company which could help assimilate Asian students.

It’s call We-YouBond, and it hopes to enroll 40-50 Chinese families this fall in a sort of pay-for-friendship model.

Spokesman Noah Scott says incoming Chinese students would be partnered with a current Purdue junior or senior, who’d be their liaison to campus.

Results from the first-ever study of Indiana’s school voucher system found negative academic effects among low-income students in math, but also showed the same students could match or outperform public school peers in English – if they remained in the private school long enough.

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