Education

Education news

Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A juvenile correctional facility in southeastern Indiana started an experiment two years ago.

It distributed secure tablet computers to all of the girls.

The goal of the technology was to help improve the girls’ educational experiences and opportunities.

But the tablets are having an impact beyond the classroom.

Tablets Give Teachers, Students More Access To Educational Tools

ISTEP+ Panel Submits Recommendations For Writing New Test

Nov 29, 2016

The ISTEP+ panel, a 23-person committee tasked with writing a recommendation for re-writing the state’s assessment system, voted on a final version Nov. 29. Rather than promoting the sweeping changes that many, including the legislature wanted, the final plan offers slight differences from the state’s current test.

The most notable changes from the current assessment system:

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Public Domain. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons

The Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne Faculty Senate passed a vote of no confidence Monday against the university’s chancellor, Vicky Carwein.

NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

The 2016 ISTEP+ scores show the number of students passing the test decreased for the second year in a row.

Fifty-two percent of students passed both the English Language Arts and Math sections of the test. This is compared to 53 percent in 2015.

Fewer students passed just the English Language Arts test- 66 percent this year compared to 67 percent in 2015.

Fifty-nine percent of students passed the math section in 2016, a drop from 61 percent in 2015.

House Committee on Education and Workforce / https://www.flickr.com/photos/edlabordems/4579749374

Indiana’s former schools chief Tony Bennett and U.S. Rep. Luke Messer are two names swirling around Washington, D.C. as possible picks by President-elect Donald Trump to be the Secretary of Education, according to journalists and policy advisors at a forum Monday.

ISTEP Panel Finishes Broad Plan To Submit To Legislature

Nov 15, 2016

The state’s ISTEP panel concluded its meetings Tuesday with a broad set of recommendations. Chair Nicole Fama will compile what was said for a recommendation to the legislature. The panel will vote on that recommendation at its final meeting, Nov. 29.

Rachel Morello / Indiana Public Broadcasting

After a school referendum failed last week, Gary Community Schools is asking the state legislature for help as it struggles with ongoing financial problems.  

The school referendum was posed after years of financial struggle and failed by only 300 votes. The district sent a letter to staff Friday, saying it wouldn’t make payroll on time.

This is the district’s second referenda to counter decreasing enrollment in recent years. Both have now failed.

When students leave a district, state money goes with them, and Gary schools struggle to maintain staff and buildings.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In an election year that’s been frustrating for so many, students at Lafayette’s Jefferson High School marched to the polls Tuesday with a sense of forward-looking optimism.

The day dawned rainy, but it had let up by the time the first group of Jeff High students walked across 18th Street to the county fairgrounds around 8:15 a.m.

Some of these students, who are studying government and American history, have turned 18 in time to vote for the first time.

Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

School districts around the state, including Clinton Central, are posing nine different referenda on ballots.

These ballot measures are becoming an important part of school funding.

School referenda became a common practice after 2008, when the legislature put caps on the amount of property taxes that could be collected.

Because property taxes were a huge revenue stream for school districts, many schools were put in a tough place financially.

Lafayette School Corporation

The Lafayette School Corporation on Wednesday announced plans to turn the former Lafayette Life Insurance building into a career academy for high school students.

Superintendent Les Huddle says next week the school board is slated to vote on a $2 million contract to buy the 94-thousand square foot building that has been vacant since the insurance company headquarters moved to Cincinnati, Ohio in 2011.

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