Education news

Owen Parrish /

Top Indiana University administrators say a long-term efficiency initiative is unlikely to result in faculty or staff downsizing.  

The project, part of the university’s Bicentennial Strategic Plan, is called the Presidential Initiative to Reduce Administrative Barriers to Academic Excellence.

Vice President for Research Fred Cate says large organizations tend to accumulate layers of administrative red tape that can make it difficult to work efficiently.

A committee, made up of seven people including Cate, will spend the next few years on the project.

Inside A Dual-Language Preschool For Migrant Workers' Children

Oct 19, 2016
Peter Balonon-Rosen/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Depending on the season, Indiana farms employ between 2,000 and 20,000 migrant farm workers. When workers migrate, often their families do, too.

Children in this mobile lifestyle can face interrupted schooling, cultural and language barriers, and social isolation — factors that inhibit a child’s ability to do well in school.

High School Grad Rates Up Nationally, Down In Indiana

Oct 18, 2016
Dave Herholz /

Federal officials announced this week the national high school graduation rate reached an all-time high of 83-percent for the 2014-2015 school year.

But while the rate is up nationally, Indiana’s graduation rate decreased for the first time since 2010.

During the 2013–2014 school year, Indiana’s four-year high school graduation rate was 87.9 percent. One year later, during the 2014-15 school year, the graduation rate is down to 87.1 percent.

Erica Gibson / WBAA News

Purdue President Mitch Daniels will make almost 99 percent of the possible pay he could have been granted for the 2016 fiscal year, even though as much as $210,000 of it was said to have been “at-risk.”

The Trustees gave Daniels almost $202,000 of that $210,000. That’s on top of his $420,000 base salary and a $100,000 bonus for staying in the job through June 30th of this year.

All told, that means Daniels will earn almost $722,000 of a possible $730,000.

Claire McInerny / IPBS

The ISTEP panel that is developing a legislative recommendation for how to replace the state’s testing system heard from a slew of national testing experts Tuesday, who make the most specific suggestions to date.


The Department of Education will release 2016 ISTEP data in the coming weeks before calculating A-F grades for schools.

Schools and parents received individual student ISTEP scores back in August, but they were embargoed. Now, the Department of Education is putting together the scores to show data at the school, district and state level.

State superintendent Glenda Ritz says statewide data will be made public in the next month.

PunchingJudy /

Bartholomew County school officials say a student overdosed on opioids Monday morning at Columbus East High School in an attempted suicide. A resource officer was able to revive the student with naloxone. School officials now say they plan to increase access to the overdose antidote.

Last spring, four Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation schools received doses of the overdose intervention drug.

Eric Weddle/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Purdue University officials joined Indianapolis school and city leaders Monday to launch a new STEM-focused charter high school set to open next year.

It’s a unique curriculum where graduates who meet Purdue's admission requirements will be a top choice for enrollment.

But as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Eric Weddle reports, some worry the school could be a drain on the Indianapolis Public Schools District.

vozach1234 /

A group of Purdue professors is getting ready to study whether grades have risen artificially in the last 30 years.

Agriculture professor Levon Esters and math professor Ralph Kaufmann, agree with President Mitch Daniels that the issue deserves consideration if Purdue wants to maintain a reputation for rigor.

“If you have a Purdue education, it means something. If you got an A here, it means something,” Kaufmann says. “It’s not like at other Universities where 40-percent of the grades are A’s, so it doesn’t mean that much.”

Rachel Morello/Indiana Public Broadcasting

A pre-K advocacy group made up of Indiana businesses and philanthropic organizations asked a group of legislators on Wednesday to give more funding to pre-K scholarships for low-income families, and legislators pushed back.

The advocacy group, which includes representatives from United Way, Eli Lilly and PNC Bank, among others, testified before the interim study committee on fiscal policy.  The committee will have influence over what is included in the state budget when the General Assembly convenes in January.