east chicago housing authority

Around 80 families are still living in lead-contaminated public housing in East Chicago, Indiana. This week, they’ll receive details about where the city plans to relocate them after the March 31 deadline to move out.

U.S. Housing and Urban Development spokeswoman Elena Gaona say 250 families have relocated from West Calumet Housing Complex since the lead crisis began last fall. Another 19 have housing lined up.

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb will visit East Chicago on Friday to discuss his disaster declaration for the city’s ongoing lead contamination crisis.

Meanwhile, lawyers for residents being displaced by the contamination say the order doesn’t properly address the biggest concerns.

 

Residents living next to a lead contaminated neighborhood in East Chicago, Indiana are now testing positive for lead. The results come after the city expanded blood testing services this summer.

So far, 21 residents of a housing complex outside the lead contaminated clean-up site have been tested for lead. Some have elevated blood lead levels. City officials couldn’t say how many.

Residents in East Chicago, Indiana, will get more time, help and money to move out of a lead-contaminated public housing complex.

The federal government announced Friday it has settled a discrimination complaint with the Chicago-based Shriver National Center on Poverty Law about the relocation.

Lauren Chapman / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The East Chicago Housing Authority is requesting $8 million from the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

It says it needs more assistance leveling a housing complex on soil contaminated with lead and arsenic hundreds of times higher than federal safety standards.

East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland announced the city’s intention to demolish the complex last June. The more than 1,000 residents are eligible for HUD relocation vouchers.

East Chicago Housing Authority

A federal judge has stepped in to halt the East Chicago Housing Authority's policy of searching tenants' apartments without a warrant or prior notice.

Wednesday's injunction stems from an Indiana ACLU lawsuit in February, months before revelations about high levels of lead in a city housing complex.

ACLU attorney Jan Mensz says the Housing Authority put in its leases it could enter people's apartments without notice for routine inspections -- in theory, things like maintenance.