drug crime

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In March, the Frankfort Police Department will begin to treat every drug overdose as a crime scene in an effort to find and convict drug dealers.

According to new overdose guidelines, officers will first respond to the overdose in a medical sense. And if an opioid was involved, they’ll administer the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

Then, officers will collect evidence and statements from the scene to help build criminal cases against drug dealers.

Deputy Chief Scott Shoemaker says he’s confident most victims won’t cooperate, so police will dig deeper.

City of Frankfort

What may have started as a dispute with a Frankfort City Council member has become a letter-writing campaign for Mayor Chris McBarnes.

Frankfort’s chief executive is trying to both combat what he sees as false rumors about possible debt the city will rack up in his last two years in this term of office and speak openly about the problems the city faces.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski mentioned that drug arrests were way up, year over year.

Any time there’s such a large change in a number like this, the question becomes: was there more crime, were police focusing more effort on rooting it out, or both?

 

Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush told lawmakers Wednesday in her State of the Judiciary address the state’s court system is prepared to meet the challenges it faces – chief among them the ongoing opioid epidemic.

Rush says she asked legislative leaders for input when preparing her speech. And she says the common theme was the court’s response to the drug crisis.

 

A key Indiana state lawmaker wants to dramatically increase penalties for certain drug and gun crimes.

The General Assembly rewrote its criminal code in recent years. Its aim was to drive more nonviolent, mostly drug offenders out of the prison system and into local treatment programs. And part of that was by giving judges more discretion in sentencing – to be able to decide what’s best for an individual offender.

Sen. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) wants to undo some of that.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski has been among the chorus of voices saying his city can’t, as the saying goes, “arrest its way out of a drug problem.”

But now that the Indiana General Assembly has made Tippecanoe County a pilot site for a new opioid treatment program, will the mayor be more bullish on that as a solution than he has been on the idea of a needle exchange? We put that question to him this week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/

A Senate committee on Monday approved a bill that would extend Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits — also known as SNAP or food stamps — to former offenders convicted of certain drug-related offenses.

A federal law prohibits former criminals convicted of, for example, trafficking controlled substances, from receiving food stamp benefits. States can choose to do away with the federal ban with a positive legislative vote.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Despite objections from Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, the Tippecanoe County Commissioners have voted to move ahead with trying to create a needle exchange program in the county. This week, on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask Mayor Roswarski if there’s a way his community can fight both the spread of communicable disease and the rise in drug-related crime it’s seen in the past couple years.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

It’s been a week Democrats in Tippecanoe County and around the state would like to forget.

But pundits say there’s not much of a left-leaning pipeline of young candidates being groomed to run in future elections.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask one prominent Democrat – Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski – whether he sees a coming generation of politicos in his party or whether more disappointment is in store.

Interiorrain / https://www.flickr.com/photos/photomemoriesflopes/

A group of Indiana lawmakers is recommending the General Assembly take up a draft bill that would offer addiction treatment to certain misdemeanor offenders.

The state currently offers such treatment to select low-level felons as part of the newly-formed Recovery Works program, which allows justice officials to decide whether to offer vouchers for services such as addiction counseling and detox programs.

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