drug abuse

Youth Survey Finds Vaping, Tobacco And Drug Use Down

Aug 25, 2017

An annual survey of Indiana teens finds the use of tobacco, vapor, alcohol and drug use on the decline.

This year the 27th Youth Survey from the Indiana University’s Indiana Prevention Resource Center analyzed answers from more than 126,000 Hoosier students – sixth to 12th grade – at 409 schools around the state. The questions cover issues ranging from use of various drugs to gambling and mental health.

The study first included the use of electronic vaping products two years ago and has found a steady decrease in the number of teen’s vaping every year.

A group of current and former inmates from Dearborn County Jail talked about their experiences in the Jail Chemical Addictions Program. (Photo by Drew Daudelin)

Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill says the state’s treatment options for drug addiction are inadequate. Now he’s formed a coalition of government, healthcare and law enforcement leaders to make the case for reform.

A group of current and former inmates from Dearborn County Jail spoke at the Public Safety Coalition’s first meeting Wednesday afternoon.

During her research on youth behavioral health, University of Indianapolis assistant professor Katherine Kivisto was struck by a connection she was seeing.

“What I was seeing was kids that had a really hard time with self-regulating their emotions and tolerating especially distressing feelings they would turn to substances as a way of coping,” Kivisto says.

The University of Indianapolis’s first study to be funded by the National Institute of Health will work to understand how emotion regulation is connected to teen addiction.

Steve Burns/Indiana Public Broadcasting

The small town of Austin, Indiana, made national headlines for an HIV outbreak tied to injection drug use two years ago.

Now, community in Scott County is making news for a different reason.

For the first time ever, the high school’s Dimensions show choir is heading to a national competition in Chicago later this month.

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On his first day of office, Governor Eric Holcomb signed an executive order creating an Executive Director of Drug Prevention, Treatment and Enforcement.

The new director, Jim McClelland, is a former CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana. He takes a firm stance that addiction should be understood to be an illness.

In his new role, he will coordinate drug-related efforts across state agencies such as the state health department and the Family and Social Services Administration.

Drug Abuse Symposium Focuses On Preventing Addiction

Oct 14, 2016
Erin DeMay / https://www.flickr.com/photos/65962201@N03/

Day two of a drug abuse symposium in Indianapolis focused on prevention Friday. Officials say a disproportionate amount of time and money is focused on what to do after someone gets addicted rather than preventing someone from becoming an addict.

The philosophy behind drug prevention has changed in the last 20 years, says Indiana Prevention Resource Center educator Jasynda Radanovich.

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Attorney General Greg Zoeller Wednesday announced another round of grant funding to distribute the overdose intervention drug naloxone to first responders around the state. Zoeller says a more sustainable funding source is necessary.

Previous grants for naloxone provided kits of the drug to law enforcement and first responders in about 45 counties.  Zoeller says new funding – $400,000 – will expand that further, with the eventual goal of statewide supply.

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It’s been a year since Governor Mike Pence declared a public health emergency in response to a historic HIV outbreak in Scott County, Indiana.

The declaration allowed the county to start a needle exchange to limit the spread of the virus through injection drugs.

The exchange was also meant to connect people to addiction treatment.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jake Harper reports, talking to people about treatment is just one of the first steps toward overcoming addiction.

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While Indiana lawmakers are considering different ways to reduce production of methamphetamine, police officers across the state are doing what they can to get the producers of the highly addictive drug off the streets.

To better understand the problem of policing meth, Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Leigh DeNoon takes us on a ride along with an Indiana State Police meth suppression team.

Flickr Creative Commons / https://www.flickr.com/photos/intropin/4499124890

The Indiana attorney general is putting a “surge” of heroin and opioid antidote into the field in order to combat a rising number of overdose deaths. The A-G announced $127 thousand in grants to three organizations Thursday to buy more Naloxone kits and train first responders on how to use them.

Attorney General Greg Zoeller calls this a “triage” phase of reducing opioid addiction. The first part, he says, is cracking down on the oversupply of strong painkillers.

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