Cummins

Holcomb Heads To India On Trade Mission

Oct 27, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb left for a week-long trade mission to India Friday. The country has deep ties to the Hoosier information technology and manufacturing sectors, and thousands of Indian students attend college here.

Holcomb will meet India-based executives for Hoosier companies like Cummins, which is also a major employer of skilled Indian workers on visas.

In Indiana, Vice President Pence's hometown has one of the top concentrations of skilled immigrant workers in the country. In Columbus, Ind., manufacturers and residents depend on open borders to move both products and people, but continued uncertainty over the Trump administration's immigration policies is leading to some anxiety there.

 

A panel of judges have decided to continue the suspension of President Donald Trump’s executive order on refugees and immigration after a hearing on Feb. 8. On Feb. 3, a federal judge halted the travel restrictions to seven countries.

Trump responded to the news by tweeting, “SEE YOU IN COURT, THE SECURITY OF OUR NATION IS AT STAKE!”

In the meantime, Indiana towns with large immigrant populations are already grappling with its impacts.

President Donald Trump’s immigration order barring refugees, as well as immigrants and visa-holders from Iraq, Iran, Syria, Libya, Yemen, Somalia and Sudan, impacts businesses with many foreign workers – including Cummins Engine.

The Columbus-based manufacturer has many employees born in other countries, and more than half of its workers are based overseas.

Courtesy Cummins Engine

New census data puts Columbus, Ind. in the top 20 cities for start-up business growth nationwide.

The numbers, released earlier this month, show that companies less than a year old made up nearly 5 percent of the city's businesses in 2014. That’s a 1.1 percent increase from 2009.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced new fuel standards for big trucks, including a 25 percent cut to tractor-trailer emissions and fuel use in the next decade.

It's part of ongoing efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. And it means big changes — and some potential new markets — for companies like trailer manufacturer Wabash National.

At the main Wabash factory in Lafayette, more than 3,000 people in hard hats and safety glasses assemble truck trailers from sheets of steel.

Indiana Competes / Facebook

More than 150 businesses from around the state are joining forces to advocate for LGBT rights this coming legislative session. 

Indiana Competes announced its formation less than a month ago and since then, the group has collected pledges from some of Indiana’s biggest names – Eli Lilly, Cummins, Anthem, AT&T, and Salesforce.  Salesforce Marketing Cloud CEO Scott McCorkle says the Hoosier State’s future success depends on attracting the best possible workforce.

Cummins / http://www.cummins.com/

Gov. Mike Pence this week is working to gain more business from China.

He’s on his sixth trade mission since taking office.

China is Indiana’s fifth largest trading partner, generating $1.4 billion for the Hoosier State last year, and some of the state’s biggest companies – including Dow AgroSciences, Eli Lilly and Cummins – have Chinese operations.

Pence says his economic development officials believe China is looking to invest more in North America, and that his trip is aimed at giving Indiana an advantage.

 

By Gretchen Frazee, Indiana Public Media

Columbus-based Cummins Incorporated and Indianapolis-based Angie’s List are two of 219 companies that have promised to create more jobs in Indiana. That’s according to the Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC). But the number of job commitments is actually down from last year. IEDC officials say the companies have committed to create more than 19,000 new jobs over the next five years. That number is actually four thousand lower than last year, but spokesperson Katelyn Hancock says it’s still good news.