Criminal Justice

Hundreds Join Indy Black Lives Matter Protest

Jul 11, 2016
Michelle Johnson

Organizers of a Black Lives Matter protest on Saturday in Indianapolis called on white allies to stand with them in the fight for justice and police reforms.

The protest at the Statehouse was one of dozens around the nation after a week that included police killings of black men in Minnesota and Louisiana, and a sniper attack that killed five white officers at a Black Lives Matter march in Dallas, Texas.

Since it began three years ago, after the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin three years ago, white people have joined the movement in increasing numbers.

Lafayette Police Department

At the end of 2015 and the beginning of 2016, Lafayette leaders announced several initiatives aimed at stemming the drug use that fuels a significant portion of the major crimes committed in the city.

Through six months of the year, crime is down about three percent from the first half of 2015, though still well above levels from 2010 and 2011.

Arthur LeBon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/arthur_lebon/21028418400

The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case concerning whether private university police departments must comply with public records laws.

The lawsuit came after the University of Notre Dame Security Police refused to hand over records for an ESPN report examining how campus police interact with student athletes.

ESPN took the university to court, arguing that although it’s a private institution, Notre Dame’s police department is a public entity authorized by the state.

VIEVU / http://www.vievu.com/

Changes could be coming to Indiana’s new police body camera footage law – even though it just took effect Friday.

Lawmakers spent months over the last year negotiating the fine details of a law governing how and when police body camera footage should be released.

The final product requires police to prove why video should not be released, rather than put the burden of proof on the public.

It was a compromise supported by both the Indiana Association of Chiefs of Police and the Hoosier Press Association.

Derek Key / https://www.flickr.com/photos/derekskey/

A multi-agency team – including judges, prosecutors, public defenders, mental health professionals and law enforcement – are using data-driven pilot programs to enact criminal justice reforms and improvements. 

But the end-results could be a generation away.

U.S. District Court, Southern District of Indiana

The FBI arrested a Brownsburg, Indiana, man on Tuesday for attempting to join the self-proclaimed Islamic State.

Agents took Akram Musleh, 18, into custody while he was attempting to board a bus from Indianapolis to New York.

The FBI believes Musleh planned to fly to Morocco en route to ISIL-controlled territory where he planned to support the U.S. designated terrorist group and fight for the organization.

Thibaud Saintin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thibaud_saintin/

Federal, state and local law enforcement are increasing public awareness and enforcement efforts surrounding human trafficking as Indiana prepares for the Indianapolis 500. 

Officials say Indiana is a “hub” for human sex trafficking because of the large sporting events it often hosts.

Former Subway Spokesman Jared Fogle Files Appeal

Apr 22, 2016
Joe Gratz / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joegratz/117048243

Former Subway spokesman Jared Fogle is due back in a Chicago courtroom May 20 for an appeals hearing.

Fogle is looking for a shorter sentence because an Indiana judge went over the 5-to-12.5 year sentencing range laid out in a plea agreement.

He's currently slated to serve more than 15 years.

Prosecutors say the sentence is warranted because Fogle's fantasies about underage kids were rooted in reality.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Ed. note: An earlier version of this story indicated the law would go into effect in July 2016. The story has been updated to correct the error.  

Starting in July 2017, Indiana will become the first state in the nation maintaining a child abuse offender registry,

The new law tracks anyone who has ever been convicted in Indiana of child neglect – or physical or sexual abuse of a child.

The Offender Registry will be maintained by the Division of State Court Administration.

Thomas Hawk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thomashawk/

Indiana judges will no longer be able to reduce sentences for serious heroin or meth dealers.  The General Assembly made this change in the law this past session -- but some lawmakers say the change begins to unravel the recent overhaul of Indiana’s criminal code.

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