Criminal Justice

Groups Press For Revival Of Bias Crimes Legislation

Mar 15, 2017

A coalition of groups is pressuring Indiana lawmakers to revive legislation that would allow judges to impose tougher sentences for crimes motivated by factors such as a person’s race, religion, disability, sexual orientation or gender identity. 

Steve Burns/Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Trump administration is laying out its plans for ramping up enforcement of illegal immigration.

Memos released Tuesday by the Department of Homeland Security say the agency is changing the way it prioritizes people for deportation.

When people who’ve entered the country illegally are detained in the Midwest, some of them fly out of Indiana.

Azra Ceylan / WBAA

The number of tips regarding the Delphi homicides case has doubled since the Wednesday release of an audio recording from one of the victims’ cell phones.

Indiana State Police, the FBI and the Carroll County Sheriff’s Department have received nearly 4,000 phone and email tips thus far.

ISP Sergeant Tony Slocum says the release of the audio recording plus a monetary award for information caused the influx of tips.

Slocum says cases are often solved with the help of information from the public.

Post-its at the Delphi United Methodist Church are a testament to a community's grief and disbelief
Azra Ceylan / WBAA

The quick thinking of one of two murdered Delphi teens may give law enforcement the necessary clue needed to find the girls’ killer.

The bodies of 14-year-old Liberty German and 13-year-Old Abigail Williams were found on Valentine’s Day, a day after they failed to return from a hike near the Delphi Historic Trail in Carroll County. The deaths quickly were treated as a homicide.

On Wednesday, Indiana State Police released an audio recording found on German’s cell phone—a three-second clip of a male voice saying “down the hill.”

flick.comphotos7776581, Nels Olsen

Court Appointed Special Advocates, or CASAs, in Tippecanoe County are learning to identify youths who are at-risk of becoming human trafficking victims. They’re also learning how to talk about the issue when red flags appear.

County CASA Executive Director Coleen Connor says human trafficking may not yet be a significant problem, locally. But she wants to prepare the volunteers for what’s likely to come in the future.

Tony Webster / https://www.flickr.com/photos/diversey/

Update: A Tip Line has been setup to receive  information regarding the deaths of Liberty German and Abigail Williams. Police ask anyone with information to call 844-459-5786.

The Carroll County Sheriff's Department says two bodies found Tuesday belong to a pair of girls who went missing over the weekend.

Abigail Williams, 13, and Liberty German, 14, both of Delphi, had been dropped off to play near a bridge in the West Central Indiana county.

Their deaths are now being treated as murders.

Purdue University

 

A former Purdue University student is suing the school and several of its officials for what he calls reverse discrimination during a sexual assault investigation.

He's the second student to sue an Indiana college claiming the application of federal Title IX legislation is biased against men.

The unnamed male student, referred to in court documents only as “John Doe,” says he was suspended as a student and dismissed from the Navy ROTC program after an unnamed female student accused him of groping her while she was asleep during the Fall 2015 semester.

Photo courtesy Lafayette Police Department

A new bill offered in the Indiana legislature would levy harsher penalties for crimes against public safety officials. It also strengthens penalties for crimes against their relatives.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Earlier this year, a state law mandated that a police department could not charge more than $150 for a copy of police body camera footage. The question now: Is $150 a fair price or might it have a cooling effect on people seeking video? WBAA’s Charlotte Tuggle reports. 

Police departments across Indiana are grappling with the cost of body-worn camera technology.

Some have quit the process altogether, saying the expense is too great for their department – even if they can recoup $150 every time someone asks for footage.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Despite various reports of police officer shortages around the country, Indiana seems to be taking less of a hit than other states. But those numbers may be misleading.

The Indiana Law Enforcement Academy (ILEA) uses an interactive video during the last week of training for prospective officers.

Officers – and even the occasional journalist -- are faced with situations that may require firing a weapon and must decide what to do. And since it’s part of firearms training, the main decision is whether to shoot.

Pages