college graduation

Ivy Tech Community College’s new strategic plan calls for more than doubling the number of degrees earned by students in the next five years.

Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann wants to boost certifications, certificates and degrees awarded statewide from about 21,000 to 50,000 annually by 2023.

She also wants to grow enrollment by more than 25 percent in the next five years from about 94,000 students to nearly 120,000 students.

To help reach that goal, the college is improving academic advising and offering eight-week classes to help recruit and retain students.

New data from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education shows students are completing college sooner than in years past. But completion rates for minority students are still behind those of their white classmates.

Overall, 1 in 3 Indiana college students graduates on-time.

John Walker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/whatcouldgowrong/4608963722

More Hoosiers are now completing college in a timely fashion, according to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education.

But black and Hispanic students are still far less likely than white students to graduate on time.

About two-thirds of Indiana students now receive a bachelor’s degree within six years. 

John Walker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/whatcouldgowrong/4608963722

A state program that covers up to 100-percent of college tuition is seeing more students ready to graduate in four years. State officials credit the rise to a 2013 law requiring students complete a certain number of credits each year -- or lose their aid.

Commissioner of Higher Education Teresa Lubbers says there’s only so much state financial aid money available.

“You always have limited state dollars, so you want to spread those as broadly as you can to benefit the largest number of students,” Lubbers says.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As college students leave their dorm rooms for the summer, they have to make a decision: take their things home or get rid of them? What’s left behind used to be pitched in a dumpster, but more campuses are taking steps to repurpose as much as possible. Officials at Depauw University in Greencastle estimate they may be saving as much as two-thirds of what used to be thrown away and getting it into the hands of needy families.

Higher Ed Commissioner Pushes Internships In Annual Address

Feb 24, 2015
courtesy State of Indiana

Indiana’s higher education commissioner says the state needs to focus on a more meaningful hands-on learning style if it wants more Hoosiers to take a chance on college. 

Indiana’s goal is to have 60-percent of Hoosiers complete a college degree or certificate by the year 2025.  And the state has a way to go.  It’s listed among the bottom 10 states when it comes to college completion.

In her “State of Higher Education” address, commissioner Teresa Lubbers says students want more practical experience from their courses.