climate change

New research from Purdue University finds that climate change could have far more adverse impacts on agriculture than originally thought.

The study provides a new “social cost of carbon.” State and federal agencies often use the metric to determine the damage additional carbon dioxide released to the atmosphere will have on society and the economy.

People who experience extreme weather events, such as droughts, hurricanes or tornadoes, aren’t highly more likely to support climate change change adaptation policies, according to a new study involving an Indiana University researcher.

While climate change does not cause extreme weather events, it can make them more intense, or happen more frequently.

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue wrapped up a Midwest road trip at the Indiana State Fair Tuesday.

Perdue met in private with state lawmakers about their goals for the 2018 Farm Bill reauthorization.

That’s the $800 billion package of laws governing the nation’s agricultural and nutritional assistance programs.

Climate change can be a polarizing topic to discuss outside of the scientific community. And Linda Prokopy, a professor of natural resource social science, didn’t mince words at recent talk about public attitudes toward climate change.

Pointing toward a Power Point presentation with the word “belief” in quotation marks, she says, “Climate change is a scientific fact, so you can’t really believe or not believe in a fact.”

courtesy Mayors National Climate Change Agenda

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has joined a growing group of municipal leaders opposed to Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

Dennis says he has joined a group of more than 200 so-called “Climate Mayors” nationwide, who’ve pledged their cities will uphold environmental regulations, even as the President seeks to escape them.

Dennis says he disagrees with assertions from Trump and many other Republicans that environmental rules are job-killers.

City of West Lafayette

The summer construction season is now in full force and you, the listeners to WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, have many questions about it.

This week, we put those to West Lafayette’s John Dennis and ask him whether he’s surprised that a project as talked about as State Street is still creating as much consternation as it is.

Also on this week’s program, will West Lafayette join the list of hundreds of other cities standing opposed to President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate change agreement?

President Donald Trump called the Paris climate accord “draconian” and “onerous” when he announced the U.S. would withdraw from the agreement, but the decision’s benefits to Indiana’s energy landscape are unclear.

Countries plan for themselves how to make the effects of climate change less severe under the Paris climate agreement. Generally, countries can adopt renewable energy sources, limit carbon emissions, or do both.

A team led by professors at Purdue University is wrapping up a six-year project with Midwestern corn farmers to help them adapt to climate change.

Useful to Useable was a $5 million project funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Linda Prokopy, a professor of Natural Resources Social Sciences at Purdue University, says the aim wasn’t only to help farmers.

“My motivation was to really figure out how we can help farmers help themselves and help the land and help the water by having better access to information,” Prokopy says.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

For much of the last week, students have been camped out in Purdue University’s administration building, hoping for a meeting with President Mitch Daniels.

They’ve got demands about how the school handles diversity that they want met before they leave. But it’s unclear whether the president will see them.

On this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation with Mitch Daniels, we ask if their demands are reasonable and we hear what steps the president is definitely NOT willing to take.

Tom Gill / https://www.flickr.com/photos/lapstrake/16144565664

Indiana’s Dunes National Lakeshore is helping scientists study the effects of climate change on maple syrup production. The park is the only site in the Midwest to take part in the study.

University of Massachusetts Amherst professor Joshua Rapp says Indiana is an important location for the study. It’s near the western edge of maple trees’ natural range-- which runs from Canada to Virginia, and the Atlantic to the Midwest.

The study looks at the ways a changing climate will affect the chemistry and sugar content of maple sap.

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