Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

WFIU/WTIU News

Indiana’s Republican U.S. Senator wants to expand national efforts to address infectious diseases caused by substance abuse disorders.

The Scott County HIV outbreak helped spark the idea for the legislation.

The “Eliminating Opioid-Related Infectious Disease Act” would allow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to expand education, monitoring and treatment efforts for infectious diseases like HIV and Hepatitis C.

Opioid Overdoses May Be Seriously Undercounted

Mar 21, 2018
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Jake Harper / Side Effects

In a refrigerator in the coroner’s office in Marion County, Indiana, rows of vials await testing. They contain blood, urine and vitreous, the fluid collected from inside a human eye. In overdose cases, the fluids may contain clues for investigators. 

Photo courtesy of the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention

New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show Indiana has a significant increase in overdoses cases.

The report examines the most recent data on overdoses at emergency departments. Indiana experienced a 35 percent increase in visits a trend that Indianapolis EMS medical director Dan O’Donnell says isn’t surprising.

Viral Maps Show Exactly How An HIV Outbreak Spread

Jan 24, 2018

Epidemiologists traditionally have depended on what people say to discover how disease spreads. But in investigating Indiana's recent HIV outbreak, the CDC tracked what the virus says — by looking at its DNA.

A shortages of qualified treatment providers is frequently cited as an obstacle in fighting the opioid addiction crisis. Yet, according to research published in the journal PLoS One, the solution may lie in the hands of primary care providers who can successfully treat addiction.

A group of 12 contiguous U.S. states in the Midwest and South has the highest rate of adult tobacco use in the nation. If taken as a country, this group would rank among those with the highest smoking rates in the world.

This is according to a report released by Truth Initiative last week. Indiana is one of these twelve states, along with neighboring Ohio, Michigan, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri.

Elad Rahmin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eladrahmin/

Deaths from drug overdoses have continued to increase in Indiana, mirroring national trends reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

According to the CDC report, the national drug-related death rate has increased more than two and a half times since 1999.

In that same time period, state health department numbers show the number of drug overdose deaths in Indiana has gone up 570 percent. In 2015, 1,236 people died from drug-related OD's.

Indiana’s new governor, Eric Holcomb, vowed to tackle the state’s drug addiction epidemic in his first State of the State address on Tuesday. But he has also said he supports Congress’s plans to repeal and replace Obamacare.

UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

A popular flu vaccination option for children is not being recommended this year. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics is not recommending FluMist for the upcoming influenza season after a panel review found it to be up to 25 percent less effective than the flu shot.

courtesy Sierra Club

Seven environmental health and justice organizations, including the Sierra Club, are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over what they say are outdated toxicity standards for lead.  

The suit comes as authorities explore just how contaminated the heavy metal has made the soil in East Chicago.

Thinkprogress.org health writer Alex Zelinski says the lawsuit claims the EPA – and not the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- should have kept more accurate records on the alarming rise of health effects of lead on humans. 

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