Carrier Company

Six months after President Donald Trump intervened in Carrier’s planned Indianapolis layoffs, the company is releasing the final number of jobs it still plans to cut.

The Department of Workforce Development got the appliance-maker’s official notification of the layoffs Monday, in a letter dated May 19.

It says 632 workers will lose their jobs at Carrier’s Indianapolis fan coil factory between late July and the end of the year.

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation has approved $7 million in tax incentives for the Carrier company to keep about a thousand jobs in Indianapolis.

Huntington UTEC Employees Feel Forgotten

Mar 15, 2017
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Courtesy/Jenni Lobdell

Layoffs have now started at the United Technologies Electronic Control factory, or UTEC, in Huntington, Indiana. Although its parent company United Technologies announced more than a year ago that UTEC and its sister company Carrier would move to Mexico, the first round of layoffs just started last Friday, according to a company spokesperson.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) will introduce a bill in Congress later this month to punish companies for outsourcing American jobs, using federal contracts and tax breaks as leverage.

At a press conference in Indianapolis Friday, Donnelly spoke alongside workers from companies moving production from Indiana to Mexico, including Rexnord and Carrier.

Lita Freeman is one of 700 employees who will be laid off at Carrier’s factory in Huntington.

President-elect Donald Trump attacked the United Steelworkers union president who represents workers at Carrier in Indianapolis on Twitter Wednesday night.

Chuck Jones heads up Steelworkers local 1999, which includes the Indianapolis Carrier and Rexnord factories. Both have come under fire from Trump for sending some jobs to Mexico.

 

As part of its deal with President-elect Donald Trump to retain some Indiana jobs, Carrier pledged to invest $16 million dollars in its Indianapolis factory.

But that investment will go toward automation, according to Carrier parent company CEO Greg Hayes.

Fewer jobs will be saved at Indianapolis’ Carrier factory than originally announced.

The United Steelworkers union told members in a letter Monday that the number of jobs saved is actually 800, not more than 1,100 as President-elect Donald Trump said last week.

Steelworkers Local 1999 vice president Robert James says it means 500 union members will still lose their jobs.

Workers celebrated at Indianapolis’s Carrier factory Thursday when President-elect Donald Trump and Vice President-elect and Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announced a deal to save more than 1,000 of their jobs.

Dawnn Kinnard is a second-generation Carrier worker whose father still works there too, after 44 years. After listening to Trump speak, she says she was heartbroken when she first found out they’d lose their jobs.

“Today I’m elated, really just to get my dad to be able to retire when he wants to retire,” Kinnard says.

(Drew Daudelin/WFYI)

 

The news that air conditioning-maker Carrier made a deal with President-elect Donald Trump to keep more than 1,000 jobs in Indianapolis came as a shock to Hoosier workers and business leaders alike.

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President-elect Donald Trump is delivering on part of a campaign promise to stop in Indiana air conditioning factory from moving to Mexico. The Carrier Company announced last night it's reached a deal with Trump to keep about a thousand jobs in Indianapolis.

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