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JD Gray/WTIU

North Central Indiana is hoping new state funds and collaborations will help attract workers and diversify local economies.

That's especially challenging in Elkhart, known as the recreational vehicle capital of the world -- and the city with the nation's highest unemployment rate during the recession.

Now, the RV industry is booming -- but that's created problems of its own.

M Sullivan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelsullivan/406152

The final changes to federal overtime pay law are out this week.

Businesses in Indiana and nationwide now have until December to figure out which of their workers can start earning OT -- and how to pay for it.

 

Under the final version of the rules, salaried employees making less than $47,476 a year will earn time and a half for working overtime.

It's twice the old threshold -- and it could cost the most for Indiana trades like retail, manufacturing and education, says Indianapolis-based compensation consultant Julie Bingham.

United Soybean Board

More wet weather didn't help Indiana farmers make up for lost time in planting corn last week -- and they weren't able to supplement with soybeans, either.

It could mean some big decisions for growers heading into summer.

Indiana planted just seven percent more of its projected corn acreage in the past week, according to the latest USDA numbers.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive

Subaru is cutting back on production and overtime at its Indiana factory to free up parts for a major recall.

The Japanese car-maker has to fix a steering problem in more than 50,000 new vehicles made recently at its only plant in North America.

The Lafayette factory employs more than 4,000 workers -- and thanks to the recall, as many as 3,000 of them may miss out on daily and Saturday overtime for the next few weeks.

WBAA News

    

    

A rate hike requested by American Suburban Utilities is now in the hands of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission.

The state is asking for a new judge in its case against IBM – the company charged with overseeing the technological overhaul of the state welfare system.

 

That's after the initial judge, David Dreyer of the Marion County Superior Court, ruled last week that the state hadn't proved IBM owed anything.

 

Dreyer was also the first judge to handle the case -- in 2012, when he ruled the company had not breached its contract to privatize and modernize Indiana's welfare system under Gov. Mitch Daniels.

The359 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/the359/

The Indianapolis 500 is a sellout for the first time in more than 20 years.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway says the last reserved seats for the 500 sold late Friday morning, 23 days ahead of Race Day.

President Doug Boles says there's been a surge of attention for the 100th running of the 500, but he says it also reflects a string of close finishes in recent years.

Boles credits the sellout to the excitement over the 100th running of the race.

slowdevil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slowdevil/3678747832/

Hoosier farmers didn't make much progress planting corn in the past week, after a strong early start -- and they're running out of time to get the state's signature crop in the ground.

Heavy spring rainfall didn't stop Indiana farmers from planting twice as much corn by the start of May as they had in 2015. They were on their way to planting a projected 2.6 percent more acres of corn than last year, despite a glut of the crop worldwide.

Pledge Drive Goals

May 4, 2016

An employee rights complaint by a former Valparaiso Menards clerk led this week to a labor victory for all 45,000 of the home improvement chain's workers across the Midwest.

The issue was over mandatory arbitration, which is legal -- companies can require employees settle complaints out of court, but they have to make sure employees know what rights they're giving up.

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