Business news

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The city of West Lafayette has hired a new development director to oversee the business investment the city will rely on to pay back the cost of its State Street overhaul.

Erik Carlson replaces Chandler Poole, who sat on the Joint Board that drew up the State Street redesign, but who left the city earlier this year to move back to his home state of Wisconsin.

Carlson has worked in economic development in Indianapolis and before that in Lexington, Kentucky, where he covered the beat as a reporter.

Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly will have a new CEO in January.

Lilly's retiring chief, John Lechleiter, led the company to new prosperity during his eight-year tenure.


His replacement, David Ricks, will have the challenge of keeping that going, according to experts like Indiana University corporate leadership professor Ken Wendeln.


Chris Johnson/Purdue Research Foundation /

 R. Byron Pipes keeps a Tupperware box of carbon fiber knick-knacks inside his office at Purdue Research Park's Indiana Manufacturing Institute—a building so new it doesn’t even show up on Google Maps.

Apart from a large orange blob, (an interesting polymer-experiment-gone-wrong, he says), the knick-knacks—hinges, chains and molds—are all made of the same feather-light, stormy-gray material: carbon fiber composite.

A Syn /

A bill planned for the upcoming legislative session aims to bring more film business to Indiana. It would create the Indiana Film and Media Production Incentive program, offering tax breaks to productions made in the state.

Now, filmmakers and lawmakers are ramping up lobbying efforts to back the bill. Jon Vickers, the founding director of the Indiana University Cinema, said it wouldn't be the first program of its kind for Indiana -- another version lasted from 2007 to 2012.

m.krema /


A new report from Purdue University says the Internet connectivity gap is widening between the state's rural and urban counties.

Indiana already ranks among the bottom 10 states for Internet access. In 2014, only 71 percent of Hoosiers had access to broadband internet, according to census data.


About 12 percent had no Internet access at all, and about one percent were still using dial-up.

Guy Montag /

A Purdue University study may have big impacts on the dairy supply chain.

Purdue researchers confirmed that a new process, similar to pasteurization, adds weeks to the shelf life of milk.


To pasteurize milk, you heat it up to 72 degrees Celsius for 15 seconds. That kills enough bacteria for the milk to last about two weeks before it goes bad.


The new process heats pasteurized milk in droplet form -- for less than a second, to about 60 degrees.

Ron Nichols/NRCS

Indiana's Farm Service Agency has officially run out of loan money for everyday farm operating costs. But Congress is stepping in to keep the FSA's real estate loans afloat.

The Farm Service Agency predicted it would run out of loan money by this month.

That was after low commodity prices and wet weather in 2015 made it tough for some farmers to pay their operating costs, or pay back their banks -- and more banks, in turn, asked the FSA to help with the debt.

Dow AgroSciences / Glassdoor

Fifteen-hundred workers in Indianapolis could know by the end of the month if they're likely to become part of the biggest agribusiness in the world.


The Dow AgroSciences employees are awaiting regulatory approval for their parent company's plan to merge with DuPont, then split into three parts, including one for agriculture.


If the $130 billion deal goes through, the ag division's corporate HQ and corporate workers would move to Wilmington, Del.

Joe Brunner / YouTube

Global trade's impact on Indiana jobs has made headlines this election season -- and so far this year, high numbers of Hoosier workers have also qualified for federal benefits due to trade-related layoffs.


Estimates from the Department of Workforce Development show that, in the last six months, more Indiana workers have qualified for federal benefits due to trade-related layoffs than in any of the past five years -- more than 3,200 since Jan. 1.



Today's manufacturers are using lighter materials -- and less of them -- to make products cheaper and more efficient. That's transforming many Indiana manufacturing jobs.

Now, the Indiana Manufacturers Association, or IMA, is teaming up with a federal group to train more workers in what's known as lightweighting.