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Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Indiana will begin registering businesses as “benefit corporations,” which gives companies the flexibility to be socially conscious while still making money. The new designation is meant to bridge the gap between for-profit and non-profit companies.

Secretary of State Connie Lawson says the benefit corporation designation protects companies against shareholder lawsuits when profits aren’t maximized at the expense of a social mission.  She notes it’s a popular concept with millennials, a group she says will make up 75 percent of the workforce in the next decade.

courtesy GE

Governor Mike Pence announced Thursday that 2015 is a record-breaking year for economic development. 

Pence says 323 companies, up from 285 in 2014, pledged to create new jobs over the next few years.

“Those 323 companies are committing to create 26,555 new Hoosier jobs" he says, "and it represents more than 4.79 billion dollars of investment in the state of Indiana.”

That’s the highest number of companies committed to expansion in the state since the creation of the Indiana Economic Development Corporation in 2005.

TheUglySweaterShop.com / https://www.flickr.com/photos/54115831@N07/

Back in Billy Brand’s early days in the restaurant business, he and his coworkers would take bets on how many Christmas sweaters they’d see in a given night. Now, he’s throwing his own ugly sweater parties. He says it’s a way for young people far from home to create a corny family tradition of their own.

"Friendship groups want to have a sense of family within themselves," he says, "So this become an odd, not quite mockery of that, but an acceptance and inclusion of it."

Chris Morisse Vizza

A new industrial park in Tippecanoe County is the first site in the state to meet stiffer development standards and earn the designation of Indiana Site Certified Gold.

That means the 164 acre site bounded on the south by Haggerty Lane and on the east by I-65 ranks high on the list of properties marketed to business and industry leaders.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As the last of a new round of garbage bins – toters, in industry parlance – banged into place in a neighborhood on Lafayette’s north side earlier this month, the sound was just the same as that of a starter’s pistol for a new financial relationship between the city and a Michigan company promising to monetize the city’s trash collection.

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