Business, Economy and Consumer Affairs

Markus Spiering / https://www.flickr.com/photos/spierisf/11372319394

Though West Lafayette leaders are thinking of changing the rules for how often rental units are inspected and how much landlords are charged for those properties, the man in charge of the process says a reason outlined in the ordinance isn’t much of a concern.

A revised ordinance up for consideration by the City Council cites what it calls “widespread problems with overoccupancy of rental housing” as a reason to rewrite the law.

Courtesy Sears Holdings

Three Indiana Sears stores will close in early September – including the one in Lafayette’s Tippecanoe Mall.

The Sears locations in Indianapolis and Muncie were also on the list of the 63 stores that will be shutting down after Sears found them to be, in the words of a corporate press release, “non-profitable.”

The Auto Centers at those locations will be shuttered in late July.

At the end of this month, 27 Indiana dairy farms – some small, some big – are nearing the end of a 90-day notice that their contracts with national distributor Dean Foods will be terminated.

A state agency representing utility customers says Indianapolis Power & Light doesn’t need a $96 million rate hike. The agency has received more than 2,700 comments from customers opposing the proposed increase. 

Indiana Unemployment Rate Holds Steady In April

May 18, 2018
The Hoosier State’s unemployment rate is at 3.2 percent for the third consecutive month. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana's unemployment rate is at 3.2 percent for the third consecutive month. Before this year, it hadn’t been that low since late 2000.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

On Saturday mornings between May and October, a crowd converges on downtown Lafayette to visit the Lafayette Farmer's Market.

Though it doesn’t take them yet, it’s one of 75 markets in Indiana officially authorized to accept benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

James Vavrek / WFIU/WTIU News

 

The Indiana Department of Workforce Development estimates there will be more than one million jobs to fill in the state by 2024 – and most of them won’t require a college degree.

Instead, many employers will be looking for highly-skilled workers with specialized certificates to fill positions in everything from manufacturing to healthcare.

Global Tech Firm Announces Expanded Indiana Jobs Plans

Apr 26, 2018

Global tech firm Infosys announced Thursday it will create more Hoosier jobs than originally planned – now 3,000 in total at its North American training center, based in Indianapolis.

Vice President Mike Pence attended the announcement after a central Indiana political event on tax reform was postponed until after the state’s May primary election.

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