Business, Economy and Consumer Affairs

Indiana joins 11 other states in a legal challenge against the state of California over egg production regulations. California passed a law in 2015 requiring all eggs sold there to come from hens raised with room to stand up and fully stretch their wings.

Eggs are a multi-billion dollar industry for Hoosiers and Indiana produces the third most eggs in the country. The state exports about one to four percent of its eggs to California each year.

A Purdue University study suggests many consumers don’t differentiate between organic and non-GMO food labels – and they’re willing to spend more on both.

Agricultural economist Jayson Lusk asked more than 1,000 consumers what they’d be willing to pay for apples and granola bars with an organic label, and a non-GMO label, which means no genetically modified ingredients.

“The extra premium people were willing to pay [was] about the same for those two labels,” he says. “That’s interesting, because one label is much more encompassing than the other.”

The Hoosier unemployment rate rose 0.1 percent in October to 3.9 percent, its highest level since March.

And while the increase wasn’t as large as it’s been the last couple of months, it’s the first time in six years the number has gone up four months in a row. And the increase over that span – nearly 1 percent – is the largest four-month spike since 2009, at the height of the recession.

Farmers Seek Delay For Hazardous Air Emission Rule

Nov 14, 2017

Chicken and hog farmers want a federal court to delay a rule that would require they report certain hazardous air emissions from manure pits, but Hoosier farmers aren’t sure how they’d comply with the rule if it goes into effect.

A federal court ruled last April farms were not exempt from a 2008 Environmental Protection Agency rule regulating hazardous air emissions. The ruling takes effect Nov. 15, but Indiana Pork Producers executive director Josh Trenary says the EPA and ag industry groups want a delay.

Grow With Google Training Launches In Indianapolis

Nov 10, 2017

Google’s Grow With Google initiative – a nationwide technology training tour – kicked off in Indianapolis Friday. The two-day conference is the beginning of a relationship between the tech giant and Indiana.

Nearly 2,000 Hoosiers registered for digital workshops and training with Google.

The initiative’s Community Engagement head Erica Swanson says Indianapolis is fifth in the country for growth in technology jobs.

Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

Last week’s heavy rainfall has added more delays to Indiana’s corn harvest.

As of this week, 70-percent of the state’s corn has been harvested – that’s compared to 85-percent at this time last year. That’s even though, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wet conditions have forced farmers to focus on corn instead of completing soybean harvests.

At Indianapolis-based pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly, 2,300 employees will take buyouts as part of the company’s effort to save money by cutting at least 2,000 jobs in the U.S. by the end of the year.

It’s unclear whether layoffs are still in the works in the Hoosier state.

Lilly said in September it would aim to save $500 million by cutting 3,500 jobs out of its more than 41,000 worldwide, with at least 2,000 cut in the U.S.

Quinn Dombrowski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

The West Lafayette City Council approved plans Monday to set physical and operational boundaries for new businesses along the Wabash River.

The so-called “riverfront” district now expands past River Road, up State Street and along Fowler Avenue. The council voted to support applications for liquor licenses in the district so long as the business' sales are at least 67-percent food (i.e. not more than one-third alcohol) or it stays open no longer than from 11 a.m. to midnight.

More than 30 East Chicago homeowners last week sued several companies the federal government holds responsible for toxic industrial contamination.

Those companies include DuPont, Atlantic Richfield, British Petroleum, U.S.S. Lead and Mueller Industries.

The lawsuit alleges those companies caused property loss to residents who live in a lead-contaminated Superfund site and that, “[f]or decades, Defendants’ lead smelting, lead refining, and other manufacturing processes wreaked environmental havoc in the Calumet neighborhood of East Chicago.”

President Donald Trump is Japan this week and told Japanese business leaders they should make more cars in the U.S., and import less. He also thanked companies that already do business in America, including ones with a huge footprint in Indiana.

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