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ArcelorMittal

 

Governor Mike Pence is backing U.S. Steel in calls for an investigation into China's steel industry.

That's after the federal government imposed new tariffs on China last week -- a move some steelworkers say doesn't go far enough.

Last month, U.S. Steel asked the U.S. International Trade Commission for a total ban on Chinese steel imports, saying practices overseas have cost thousands of American jobs.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Daily fantasy sports companies have until August to declare they want to keep doing business in Indiana.

In March, Indiana became the second state to formally affirm daily fantasy games are legal -- four states have followed since.

Indiana's law sets a $50,000 registration fee for the operators. The Indiana Gaming Commission wants a letter of intent by August 1 from companies who plan to run games, with a full application due by November.

CAFNR / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cafnr/10580373474/

There's a better-than-expected outlook for Indiana agriculture in a report out this week on what would happen if Congress ratifies the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

The TPP is President Obama's big trade deal to reduce tariffs and open new markets with Pacific Rim countries. Congress could vote on it this year, and asked for this forecast from the U.S. International Trade Commission as part of that debate.

JD Gray/WTIU

North Central Indiana is hoping new state funds and collaborations will help attract workers and diversify local economies.

That's especially challenging in Elkhart, known as the recreational vehicle capital of the world -- and the city with the nation's highest unemployment rate during the recession.

Now, the RV industry is booming -- but that's created problems of its own.

M Sullivan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaelsullivan/406152

The final changes to federal overtime pay law are out this week.

Businesses in Indiana and nationwide now have until December to figure out which of their workers can start earning OT -- and how to pay for it.

 

Under the final version of the rules, salaried employees making less than $47,476 a year will earn time and a half for working overtime.

It's twice the old threshold -- and it could cost the most for Indiana trades like retail, manufacturing and education, says Indianapolis-based compensation consultant Julie Bingham.

United Soybean Board

More wet weather didn't help Indiana farmers make up for lost time in planting corn last week -- and they weren't able to supplement with soybeans, either.

It could mean some big decisions for growers heading into summer.

Indiana planted just seven percent more of its projected corn acreage in the past week, according to the latest USDA numbers.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive

Subaru is cutting back on production and overtime at its Indiana factory to free up parts for a major recall.

The Japanese car-maker has to fix a steering problem in more than 50,000 new vehicles made recently at its only plant in North America.

The Lafayette factory employs more than 4,000 workers -- and thanks to the recall, as many as 3,000 of them may miss out on daily and Saturday overtime for the next few weeks.

WBAA News

    

    

A rate hike requested by American Suburban Utilities is now in the hands of the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission.

The state is asking for a new judge in its case against IBM – the company charged with overseeing the technological overhaul of the state welfare system.

 

That's after the initial judge, David Dreyer of the Marion County Superior Court, ruled last week that the state hadn't proved IBM owed anything.

 

Dreyer was also the first judge to handle the case -- in 2012, when he ruled the company had not breached its contract to privatize and modernize Indiana's welfare system under Gov. Mitch Daniels.

The359 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/the359/

The Indianapolis 500 is a sellout for the first time in more than 20 years.

The Indianapolis Motor Speedway says the last reserved seats for the 500 sold late Friday morning, 23 days ahead of Race Day.

President Doug Boles says there's been a surge of attention for the 100th running of the 500, but he says it also reflects a string of close finishes in recent years.

Boles credits the sellout to the excitement over the 100th running of the race.

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