auto industry

President Donald Trump is Japan this week and told Japanese business leaders they should make more cars in the U.S., and import less. He also thanked companies that already do business in America, including ones with a huge footprint in Indiana.

Indiana reportedly won’t be the location of a new Toyota-Mazda plant slated for construction in the U.S. in the next few years.

The South Bend Tribune reports economic development officials in St. Joseph County announced this week that Indiana had been dropped from consideration.

Holcomb Departs For Trade Mission In Hungary, France

Jun 11, 2017

Eric Holcomb leaves Monday for his first international economic development trip as governor. He’ll spend 10 days in Hungary and France, hoping to shore up global ties for Indiana’s top-earning manufacturing and automotive industries.

Indiana is already a center of investment for countries that include Japan and Germany. But the Indiana Economic Development Corporation says the Hoosier State will be the first to create what it calls a “formal framework with Hungary” to promote business and trade development.

Japanese Automotive Sector Grows In Indiana

Jun 22, 2016
Indiana Business Research Center

 

Japan's largest steel company, Nippon Steel, will spend $50 million and create 70 jobs at a new plant to produce wiring for cars in Shelbyville.

When it opens next year, it'll join an already large Japanese automotive sector in the state -- which houses more Japanese businesses than anywhere else in the country.

 

Japan is also Indiana’s biggest foreign investor, supporting almost 54,000 jobs. Many are in manufacturing.

David Wilson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidwilson1949/12783674125

Steelmaker ArcelorMittal, whose largest North American mill is at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, is introducing a new high-strength steel for cars.

It's part of an effort to boost profits at the world's largest steel producer by volume -- amid an uncertain time for the industry.

The new steel is designed for the interior rails and pillars that make cars safer during a crash.

A spokesperson from Arcelor says it should make cars lighter and cheaper to produce when it's rolled out next year.  

Indiana University / Facebook

Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business reports the national and global economic struggles are hitting Indiana’s economy.

The school’s 2016 Economic Forecast says the business investment and government sectors are behind, which will contribute to growth next year that’s expected to be a few tenths of a percent below average. IU Economic Analysis Director Tim Slaper says policy uncertainty in Washington also negatively affects economic growth.