Alzheimer's Disease

Awareness Is Aim Of Early Alzheimer's Advisor

Aug 22, 2017

An Indiana woman will play a role in steering the national Alzheimer’s Association when it comes to the disease’s early stages.

Mary Kay Tarbell was recently named as an Early-Stage Advisor for the Alzheimer’s Association. The position provides an opportunity to advance awareness about the importance of early diagnosis.

Tarbell knew the signs of Alzheimer’s.

“I kind of felt the creeping questions,” she says she started asking. “Why am I forgetting this?”

The Indiana University School of Medicine is getting $25 million from the Lilly Endowment to recruit new scientists to Indiana, and to pair them up directly with big Indiana companies.

Medical school research dean Anantha Shekhar says it aims to fast-track the creation of treatments from discoveries about cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s and more.

He says new technologies like gene sequencing are facilitating those applications faster than ever.

Neil Conway / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411

Numbers recently made available on an Indiana State Department of Health website show a significant increase in the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease among Hoosiers.

In 2011, just more than 2,000 Alzheimer’s deaths were recorded in Indiana. But in 2015 – the most recent year with state data – that figure had climbed by more than a quarter, to more than 2,500.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Carolyn Kelso and her husband Robert live in a big house north of Indianapolis, with original paintings on the wall and furry throws on the furniture. Carolyn herself is 71, with short blonde hair and stylish chunky black glasses. 

She and her husband take their health seriously, and her mother suffered from Alzheimer’s, so she noticed right away when something was wrong.

“I’d get to the car and go down to the corner, and couldn’t remember where I was going, couldn’t remember if I was going left or right,” Carolyn Kelso says.

milosz1 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikolski/

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly is doubling down on its anti-Alzheimer’s disease efforts. Even though a high-profile Alzheimer’s drug failed its most recent trial, the pharma giant is still holding out hope the science behind the therapy can work.

Solanezumab would have been a Prozac-style blockbuster for Lilly. Instead, a late-stage clinical trial found it didn’t work the way scientists hoped.

Paul Sableman / https://www.flickr.com/photos/pasa/

After a promising Alzheimer’s drug failed a late-stage clinical trial, pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly has announced it will be laying off workers around the country.

The news of layoffs follows last month’s announcement concerning the failure of Solanezumab, which Lilly hoped would be the first drug to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s Disease.

Neil Conway / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/

Eli Lilly has announced a promising drug that would have become the first disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease has failed a late-stage clinical trial.

The results come as a devastating blow for Indianapolis-based Lilly, which had sunk decades of research and hundreds of thousands of dollars into the medication, called solanezumab, or “sola.”

The pharmaceutical world had held its breath awaiting the results of the final-stage study, which were expected to be released in early December.

Bloomington Symphony Orchestra

More than 110,000 Hoosiers suffer from some form of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. 

There's currently a growing trend to use more personalized therapy options for patients.

In Indianapolis, a handful of Butler University students work with residents who have Alzheimer's and dementia at an assisted living facility.

They are crafting a personalized therapeutic tool – a music playlist.

Ninety-one-year-old Bessie Mays talks about growing up in Nashville, Tennessee. 

Joey Lax-Salinas / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joeybls/

A judge Tuesday denied Indiana University’s attempt to join a lawsuit by the ACLU and Planned Parenthood challenging Indiana’s new anti-abortion law. 

The ACLU of Indiana, on behalf of Planned Parenthood, filed a lawsuit last month seeking to block a new state law that bars abortions performed solely because of a fetus’ potential disability, sex or race. 

Indiana University says a different part of the law, one that bans receiving fetal tissue, will criminalize its research on Alzheimer’s disease. 

Indiana University / Facebook

The ACLU of Indiana says it has no issue with Indiana University joining its lawsuit against the state over controversial anti-abortion legislation.

But the Indiana Attorney General’s office wants to block IU’s action.

The ACLU, on behalf of Planned Parenthood, filed suit last month seeking to block legislation that bans abortions performed solely because of a fetus’ potential disability, gender or race. 

Indiana University also wants to challenge the law, specifically, a section that criminalizes the receiving of fetal tissue. 

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