addiction treatment

Opioid Treatment Access Expanding In Indiana

Feb 9, 2018

Hoosiers in need of addiction treatment have a couple new resources now. The Family and Social Services Administration or FSSA, announced this week, efforts to increase access to treatment in the state with the help of federal funds.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Three out of every four Indiana jails are overcrowded, according to the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute.

The majority of sheriffs say their inmate population has increased significantly since the passage of a criminal code revision nearly four years ago. And some are trying to find local solutions before they’re hit with a lawsuit.

Indiana will add five new opioid treatment programs (OTP) across the state to help combat the ongoing drug abuse epidemic and the initiative will also includes coverage of the treatment drug methadone.

The announcement came Wednesday at the Valle Vista treatment center in Greenwood. Indiana Family and Social Services Administration Secretary Jennifer Walthall says the center is being added to the state’s OTP efforts and will offer methadone.

A record number of stakeholders from around Indiana met to learn about the state’s progress and challenges in the field of mental health and addiction.

Indiana’s annual Mental Health Symposium began 20 years ago. Indiana University Institute of Psychiatric Research director John Nurnberger helped organize from the start. He says while there’s greater mental health awareness in Indiana – stigma is still a major barrier.

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Cristian C / Flickr

The GOP's proposed health law, the American Health Care Act, has some mental health and addiction treatment advocates worried.

Indiana’s new governor, Eric Holcomb, vowed to tackle the state’s drug addiction epidemic in his first State of the State address on Tuesday. But he has also said he supports Congress’s plans to repeal and replace Obamacare.

NIAID / https://www.flickr.com/photos/niaid/

It’s been a year since Governor Mike Pence declared a public health emergency in response to a historic HIV outbreak in Scott County, Indiana.

The declaration allowed the county to start a needle exchange to limit the spread of the virus through injection drugs.

The exchange was also meant to connect people to addiction treatment.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jake Harper reports, talking to people about treatment is just one of the first steps toward overcoming addiction.

Today At The Statehouse: The 2016 Session's Final Days

Mar 8, 2016
Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

BMV FEES  

Legislators should take a final vote this week on making license branch trips cheaper and easier.

Two million motorcyclists, truckers and bus owners will see their costs go down as dozens of fees are eliminated entirely.

BMV general counsel Adam Krupp says Hoosiers who own only a car probably won’t see their costs change – but they could.

Courtesy Attorney General's Office

A proposed $1.1 billion plan includes $920 million for ‘cooperative agreements with states,’ which could include programs in Indiana. Zoeller says he’d like to have Indiana first in line for that funding.

“The numbers of people we’re talking about are really beyond our capacity to address,” Zoeller says. “So we really are going to need federal help. “

The proposal is part of President Obama’s overall budget, which must be approved by Congress.