Addiction

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Starting December 1, patients on Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan will have an easier time getting certain opioid addiction medications. The four insurers that manage plans for Indiana’s Medicaid program, HIP 2.0, are eliminating an administrative hurdle that can cause patients to wait days to receive their prescription, leaving them vulnerable to relapse and overdose.

Gretchen Frazee / IPBS

After months of struggling to secure a location, the Tippecanoe County Health Department plans to inaugurate a needle exchange program in its building this Friday. 

The program comes nearly a year after a public health emergency was issued for the county.

Legislation Aims To Increase Addiction Providers

Jun 29, 2017

More than half of Indiana counties don’t have mental health care options available. A new bipartisan proposal in Congress to increase the number of providers specializing in addiction treatment.

U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) says many Hoosiers, just like many in America, are battling addiction to opioids and other dangerous substances. And he says there’s s a need for more professionals on the front lines.

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Esther Honig / Side Effects/WOSU

Charlie Stewart is tall, 25 years old, and broad-shouldered. He’s wearing a gray polo shirt and slacks, and starts each morning with a protein shake.

Every Tuesday you can find him walking the narrow linoleum halls of the emergency department at Mount Carmel West in Columbus, Ohio.

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Indiana senators are looking to add more restrictions and regulations to county syringe exchange programs, or SEPs.

Four amendments have been added a bill granting counties the ability to set up their own syringe services programs. Currently, the state health commissioner must certify a public health emergency before such a program can be created.

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A bill that would give counties the ability to set up needle exchanges without first getting state approval is one step closer to becoming law.

A Senate committee has approved the bill despite concerns from Attorney General Curtis Hill.

The Attorney General’s office says it’s neutral on the legislation, but nevertheless sent a representative to Wednesday’s Health and Provider Services Committee with a list of amendments.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski touted reductions in many different categories of crime.

But publicly available data created by the Lafayette Police Department doesn’t seem to jibe with the mayor’s announced statistics.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask him to explain how his numbers are so different from the ones the public can see.


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A group of Indiana lawmakers is recommending the General Assembly take up a draft bill that would offer addiction treatment to certain misdemeanor offenders.

The state currently offers such treatment to select low-level felons as part of the newly-formed Recovery Works program, which allows justice officials to decide whether to offer vouchers for services such as addiction counseling and detox programs.

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A recent study finds the taste of alcohol is closely linked to addiction markers in the brain.  

The research project from a team at the IU School of Medicine is the first to use two different types of advanced brain imaging techniques to strengthen evidence that reward receptors in the right side of the brain are tied to addiction. 

Assistant Research Professor of Neurology Brandon Oberlin says the study, conducted with 28 male beer drinkers, sought to find out what areas of the brain are 

  involved when a beer drinker tastes beer.

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Four Indiana health centers will receive more than $1.5 million in federal funding to address heroin and opioid abuse.

The funds are part of a $95 million initiative from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services distributing funds to federally-recognized clinics called health centers.

Julia Wernz is the Director of Behavioral Health at Valley Professionals Community Health Center near Terre Haute, which is getting $406 thousand.

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