abortion

A lawsuit challenging Indiana's 2018 anti-abortion law marks the sixth suit Planned Parenthood has brought in federal court against the state since 2011. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Planned Parenthood and the ACLU want a federal judge to strike down parts of Indiana’s new anti-abortion law.

The lawsuit challenges the 2018 law’s new abortion complication reporting requirements and mandated yearly inspections of abortion clinics. Under previous law, such inspections were optional.

Holcomb Signs Controversial Abortion Reporting Bill

Mar 25, 2018
Gov. Eric Holcomb says the abortion reporting requirements bill does not restrict access to abortion. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Gov. Eric Holcomb signed the remaining legislation from the 2018 session Sunday. That includes a measure that creates new abortion reporting requirements for all Indiana doctors and hospitals.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

The Senate sent legislation to the governor Wednesday to impose new abortion reporting requirements on all doctors and hospitals across the state.

The bill creates a long list of abortion complications. That list ranges from blood clots and cardiac arrest to anxiety and sleeping disorders. And the legislation says if a woman has ever had an abortion, and suffers one of those complications, any doctor or hospital that treats her must report that complication to the state.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Health care providers across the state will be subject to new reporting requirements when it comes to complications from abortions.

That’s under legislation approved by the House Wednesday.

The bill creates a long list of potential abortion complications physicians, hospitals, and clinics must report to the state. It includes everything from blood clots and cardiac arrest to anxiety and sleeping disorders.

A Senate committee moved forward Wednesday with Statehouse Republican’s annual effort to impose further regulations on abortion.

A federal judge permanently struck down key portions of Indiana’s controversial 2016 anti-abortion bill.

A Planned Parenthood clinic in northwest Indiana has halted abortions because of a state law that involves doctors’ admitting privileges marking the first time the state has used the law to stop services.

In a letter earlier this month the Indiana State Department of Health told the Merrillville Planned Parenthood to stop performing abortions because a doctor with admitting privileges had ended their relationship with the clinic.

A judge’s ruling halting parts of the state’s new anti-abortion law is, in the words of retiring Indiana Planned Parenthood CEO Betty Cockrum, a “fine last hurrah” for her.

An anti-abortion group is criticizing a decline in Planned Parenthood’s services and clients over the last decade. The attack comes as the number of abortions increased slightly.

The number of patients at Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky is down about 50 percent since 2007. The organization went from 35 clinics to 17 in that time.

Indiana Right to Life president Mike Fichter says that’s proof the organization is failing.

Planned Parenthood wants a court to halt portions of a new Indiana abortion law. It’s the fifth lawsuit over abortion legislation in seven years.

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