2017 Session

Attorney General Curtis Hill will continue to live in the Indianapolis area despite the repeal of a law requiring him to do so.

Senate Bill 400 changed two words in the Indiana code: “at Indianapolis” became “in Indiana.” That refers to where the attorney general is required to live.

Holcomb Signs Budget, Road Funding Bills

Apr 27, 2017

Gov. Eric Holcomb says lawmakers “over-delivered” on an ambitious agenda this session. And veterans groups call the spending bill Holcomb signed into law the “most veteran-friendly budget” in state history.

Holcomb applauded lawmakers for “leadership and teamwork,” praising them for finishing on-budget and a week ahead of schedule in the 2017 session.

Holcomb Signs Indiana Pre-K Bill Into Law

Apr 27, 2017

With little fanfare, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a bill Wednesday that will expand Indiana’s pre-K pilot program.

The new plan will expand state-funded preschool to 20 counties, tie it to the state’s private school voucher program and include a controversial option for online preschool.

Currently, the $10 million state-funded On My Way Pre-K program serves around 2,000 low-income students in five counties. Expanding preschool access in Indiana has been a key goal of lawmakers this session, including Holcomb.

Gov. Eric Holcomb’s legislative agenda was broken down into what he called the five pillars, including upgrading infrastructure, attacking the drug epidemic, and strengthening the workforce.

Within those pillars were 28 individual legislative initiatives. And Holcomb secured all or part of 26 of them.

Holcomb praised the collaborative effort between his office and lawmakers.

 

Convenience store owner Jay Ricker says he’s been targeted by the General Assembly in proposed legislation on alcohol carryout permits.

The proposed legislative language would bar Ricker from renewing his permits next year.

At issue are restaurant permits Ricker’s was able to secure at two convenience stores. Those permits allow them to sell cold beer and hard liquor for carryout – previously, the sole right of liquor stores and restaurants.

Few Issues Remain Undecided In Vaping Regulations Bill

Apr 17, 2017

 

House and Senate authors of new vaping regulations say they’re in 99 percent agreement on the bill as the session’s end draws near.

There’s general agreement in the e-liquid bill about rules that include reporting ingredients to state regulators and certain labeling and bar code requirements.

Indiana’s new revenue forecast is slightly more optimistic about the state’s fiscal picture for the next two years. But House and Senate fiscal leaders say it doesn’t change their budget plans.

Local officials say their piece of the road funding pie needs to be a lot bigger after a significant decrease in the Senate plan. The Senate proposal cut local funding by more than two-thirds from the House version.

And while local officials obviously aren’t happy with the funding decrease in the Senate roads bill, there are other provisions they’d also like to see changed.

House Approves Vaping Regulations Bill

Apr 6, 2017

The House overwhelmingly approved a bill to regulate Indiana’s vaping industry, aiming to undo a monopoly created by existing law.

Indiana’s existing e-liquid law forced dozens of manufacturers to either leave the state or shut down, leaving only seven sanctioned companies.

A federal court ruling earlier this year struck down the bulk of existing regulations.

 

Legislation allowing police to collect DNA samples from anyone they arrest for a felony took a step closer to becoming law.

Backers of the legislation say DNA collection will help identify the guilty and exonerate the innocent.

Under the bill, if a person is arrested but not charged within one year, the DNA record can be expunged. The same is true if charges are dismissed or the person is acquitted.

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