2016 Elections

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The Indiana Democratic Party Thursday accused Secretary of State Connie Lawson of incompetence, partisanship and inflammatory rhetoric surrounding recent voter fraud allegations.

About a month ago, the Indiana State Police began investigating a group called the Indiana Voter Registration Project for possible voter fraud.

That progressive advocacy group then accused state Republicans of inhibiting liberal get-out-the-vote efforts. The police investigation is now in 56 counties.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

Thousands of Hoosier voters’ registration information has been changed – leaving many unsure if they’re still registered.

Secretary of State Connie Lawson’s office received complaints from voters who couldn’t find their registration information or discovered that information had been changed.

That includes changes to first names and birth dates.

Lawson’s office says it discovered thousands of records have been altered and has passed that information onto the State Police for an investigation of possible voter fraud.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Labor unions are hoping to gain back some of the power they've lost in Indiana in recent decades by getting out the vote for state and local Democrats in November.

But with a distracting presidential campaign backdrop and an uphill battle to reform state labor policies, organizers are facing a lot of obstacles.

At a United Auto Workers training center in Kokomo, Terri Mutran sits at a laptop, calling members to tell them who the UAW and other unions have endorsed in Indiana.

Brandon Smith / IPBS

Democrats say Indiana Republicans are putting party over country by refusing to withdraw support for presidential candidate Donald Trump over his remarks about sexually assaulting women.

Democrats call it the GOP’s “deafening silence.”

Republican candidates for federal and statewide offices condemned Donald Trump’s remarks from a 2005 video in which he talks about kissing and inappropriately grabbing women without their consent.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

The head of the United Auto Workers was in Indiana on Monday, urging union members to vote for Democratic Senate candidate Evan Bayh.

His tour included a stop in Kokomo, where big Chrysler and GM plants make the UAW local the largest in Indiana and Ohio, with around 7,000 members.

UAW international president Dennis Williams told a group of them he hasn't always agreed with Evan Bayh. But he said this year, Bayh's pro-labor history sets him apart -- Bayh passed collective bargaining as Indiana governor in the 1980s.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Despite a successful test of Tippecanoe County’s voting equipment Thursday, the county Election Board is dealing with another issue concerning misprinted ballots.

Unlike in last year’s election, when nearly 100 voters were given ballots with the incorrect races on them, this year’s error concerns the names of the candidates.

More than a quarter of the names on the ballot either feature a misspelling or a name listed in a way different from how the candidate filed it.

Students Question Gov. Candidates In Race's First Debate

Sep 28, 2016
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

This week’s first gubernatorial debate, a town-hall-style event at Indianapolis’ Lawrence North High School featured questions not from a moderator, but from students, teachers and administrators.

Republican candidate Eric Holcomb, Democratic candidate John Gregg and Libertarian candidate Rex Bell faced questions on standardized testing, Indiana’s teacher shortage, youth job availability and higher education. They laid out similar policy positions on almost all issues.

Holcomb Releases Education Platform

Sep 26, 2016
Brandon Smith / IPBS

Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Holcomb unveiled his education plan Monday during the annual meeting of Indiana school boards and local superintendents.

He proposes using a combination of  federal, state, parental and private dollars to expanding the state's preschool program.

But he stops short of seeking universal pre-k.

Holcomb also wants teachers to feel they have a say in state policy discussions.

Steve Burns / WTIU

Both of Indiana’s gubernatorial front-runners say the state’s current system for fighting drug-related disease needs an overhaul.

When it comes to state-funded syringe exchange programs, both lean toward reforming the current system, though one more emphatically than the other.

Even though state-approved syringe exchange programs were made legal last year in an effort to curb the spread of drug-related disease, the state doesn’t offer assistance to those programs. And the law explicitly bans using state money to purchase the needles themselves.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

One of the biggest issues in this year’s race for the Indiana House of Representatives District 26 seat may be how to improve the state’s education system.

In the first debate of the race Thursday, Democratic candidate Vicky Woeste said the state needs to reject what she calls the ALEC-driven education agenda, referring to the conservative group which drafts right-leaning legislation for statehouses across the country.

Woeste says she wants to restore public school funding, noting the West Lafayette School Corporation has asked for referendum funding due to cuts.

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