2016 Elections

Indiana Public Media / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/8409284742

Indiana’s 2016 gubernatorial race could be a repeat of 2012 after Democrat John Gregg Thursday announced he’ll run for governor again.  But he might have competition for the nomination this time.

Gregg indicated back in 2013 he wouldn’t seek another shot at the governor’s office, but in the months since, rumors start circulating that the former House Speaker was changing his mind. 

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WFIU Public Radio

If Angie‘s List CEO Bill Oesterle decides to challenge Governor Mike Pence in next year‘s primary election, one analyst says he will have his work cut out for him, regardless of the public‘s opinion of the religious freedom law.

Oesterle announced on Wednesday that he was resigning as CEO of Indianapolis-based Angie’s List to become, in his words, "more civically active" in the state.

But Andy Downs, director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Indiana University-Purdue University-Fort Wayne says that doesn‘t mean Oesterle would necessarily beat Pence.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Though he’s not declaring his candidacy yet, Congressman Todd Rokita (R-4th) says he is considering a run for the Senate seat set to be vacated by Dan Coats (R-IN) next year.

Rokita says it was his time on the senator’s staff that helped him decide to become a politician.

“I was an intern in his office at one point in time. I was a very young man – an unpaid intern. And so in many ways, Dan Coats gave me the bug for public service,” Rokita says.

courtesy Christina Hale

The feeding frenzy sure to follow the announcement of a U.S. Senate seat coming open in Indiana commenced in earnest Wednesday, with a bevy of current and former politicians saying they’re considering trying to replace Dan Coats (R-IN).

Rep. Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis), who toyed with running for Indy mayor before deciding against it, now says he thinks his platform may be better suited for an even higher office.

U.S. Senate / http://www.coats.senate.gov/

U.S. Senator Dan Coats Tuesday announced he will not run for reelection in 2016.

Coats had spoken in recent months about whether to run again, noting that how Congress functioned with Republican majorities would play a major role. 

In a video statement Tuesday, the Hoosier Senator said choosing not to run was not an easy decision. 

“While I believe I am well-positioned to run a successful campaign for another six-year term, I have concluded that the time has come to pass this demanding job to the next generation of leaders,” he says in the video.

Indiana Public Media / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/8409284742

After losing the 2012 governor’s race to Mike Pence by a closer-than-expected three percentage points, former House Speaker John Gregg may be ready to mount another such campaign next year.

courtesy New Hampshire Public Radio

Recent history suggests a small minority of people will pay attention to politics on this, Election Day 2014.

But one person who will be is NPR's National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.

Liasson was in West Lafayette recently and sat down with WBAA News Director Stan Jastrzebski to give her view on how this year's almost forgotten election will have an impact not just on the political landscape for the next two years, but also on the 2016 presidential race.

Courtesy Evan Bayh

Former U.S. Senator Evan Bayh says the growing partisan divide in Indiana is the reason for his decision not to make another bid for the governor’s mansion in 2016. 

Bayh’s continued popularity in the state Democratic Party, combined with a still-robust campaign war chest, fueled speculation about a run for governor in two years. 

But Bayh says while he has big ideas for the state, he has to consider his ability to get those ideas implemented, given the state’s political realities.

Purdue University

Some questions for this month's talk, which can be heard in its entirety from 12:00-12:30 and 6:00-6:30 on WBAA News Wednesday:

You responded Monday to the IPFW faculty senate about comments you made about whether research should be done at regional campuses. What prompted you to respond?

How do you see campuses like IPFW and IUPUI playing into Purdue’s research mission going forward?

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