What's New

Tuesday nights at 8pm

What's New is a look at classical music today. The two hour weekly show takes an in-depth look of composers, artists, and themes. New releases, new music, and rising stars range from George Li and Augustin Hadelich to John Luther Adams and Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Host John Nasukaluk Clare finds connections and shares enthusiasm for this amazing art form.

Trinity.edu

The Silent Generation - people born from the mid 1920s to the early 1940s. Time magazine coined the term in a November 1951 article entitled "The Younger Generation," and the name has remained ever since! The group was comparatively small because the financial insecurity of the 1930s and the war in the early 1940s  - resulting in people having fewer children.

We’ll hear from a not so silent group born in 1938: composers Joan Tower, William Bolcom, Paul Chihara, John Corigliano, Frederic Rzewski, Charles Wuorinen, and John Harbison – on today’s What’s New!


Noah Sheldon

A new program airs Sunday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: Serebrier

Jul 31, 2016
http://www.musicweb-international.com/SandH/2007/Jan-Jun07/serebrier.htm

The first published use of the word "multitask" appeared in an IBM paper describing the capabilities of the IBM System/360 in 1965. We might think of an example of multitasking as a short-order cook: keeping several orders memorized while frying eggs, flipping pancakes, taking orders at the counter, and refilling coffee!

We’ll hear from a musician who conducts, composes, and records with the greatest of ease – the multitasking maestro, Jose Serbrier – on today’s What’s New!

Clive Barda

A new program airs Sunday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: Cello

Jul 23, 2016
Decca / Harald Hoffmann

Jean-Louis Duport played the cello. The sweetness and beauty of his tone is said to have surprised Voltaire, who supposedly quipped, "Monsieur Duport, you will make me believe in miracles, for I see that you can turn an ox into a nightingale."

Telarc International

Actor Edmund Gwenn – Kris Kringle from Miracle on 34th Street – is supposed to have said on his deathbed, “Yes, dying is tough, but not as tough as comedy.”

We’ll hear from the master comedian and composer Peter Schickele on this episode of What’s New. Schickele was born in Ames Iowa on July 17th, 1935. He grew up in North Dakota, and studied music at Juilliard. Peter celebrated 50 years of PDQ Bach in December 2015 and in September 2016 the world premiere of PDQ Bach’s Concerto for VERY Grand Piano takes place.

Be sure to take a look behind the scenes of Peter Schickele with 50 years of photos here. Upcoming appearances can be found here.


PeterSchickele.com

A new program airs Sunday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: Piano

Jul 7, 2016
http://www.shumanassociates.net/

The piano is a remarkable instrument. Composer Robert Schumann once said, “You write to become immortal, or because the piano happens to be open, or you've looked into a pair of beautiful eyes.” Grammy Award winner and actress Alicia Keys shared: “When I had nothing else, I had my mother and the piano. And you know what? They were all I needed.”

We’ll hear piano works with Marianna Prjevalskaya, Stephen Beus, Patricia Hase, and Shai Wosner with his release, Concertos and Capriccios!


Xun Wang

A new program airs Sunday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


What's New: Colors

Jun 27, 2016
pilar timpane

A study in 2013 from UC Berkeley looked at how the human brain reacts to music. According to scientist Stephen Palmer, we associate anything music with a particular hue from the color spectrum. Whether it’s a classical work or pop, we automatically make music-color connections based on how the various melodies make us feel.

We'll hear works based on primary colors: Blue, Red, and Yellow; plus feature Rainbow Body, Synethésie, and a Nick Drake song, Pink Moon!

Composers include Jennifer Higdon, John Corigliano, and Joan Tower.


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