All Things Considered on AM920

Weekdays at 4pm
Melissa Block, Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish

Since its debut in 1971, this afternoon radio newsmagazine has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Heard by more than 11 million people on over 600 radio stations each week, All Things Considered is one of the most popular programs in America. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Robert Siegel and Audie Cornish present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. A one-hour edition of the program is produced on the weekend.

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Author Interviews
6:48 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

The Other Rock History

Singer Ian Curtis on stage in 1980 with Joy Division, whose song "Transmission" is among those explored in Greil Marcus' book The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs.
Rob Verhorst Redferns

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 8:43 pm

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Animals
6:37 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

When Wildlife Documentaries Jump The Shark

Discovery Channel identifies the shark in this promotional image as the "Shark of Darkness." And in the "documentary" by that name, supposed scientists describe how this monster "submarine" shark is over 30 feet long. But submarine sharks aren't real, and the documentary is fake — an important fact critics say is easy to miss.
Chris Fallows Discovery Channel

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 8:22 pm

This summer's Shark Week on the Discovery Channel was the highest-rated in the special's 27-year history. But that success has also brought complaints.

The network has been criticized for pushing entertainment at the cost of science, with "documentaries" that advance dubious theories — or are entirely fake. Discovery Channel has aired specials about everything from mythical monster sharks in Louisiana's rivers to long-extinct Megalodons supposedly still swimming the seas.

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Business
5:29 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

Beware: Your Uber Ride May Come With A Side Of Oversharing

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 6:37 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sports
5:29 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

Len Elmore: Black Athletes Need To Speak Out About Ferguson

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 8:00 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
5:29 pm
Sat August 30, 2014

Saavy PR Campaign Has Lured Many To Fight In Syria's Civil War

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 6:37 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Law
7:21 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Federal Judge Blocks Texas Abortion Restrictions

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

Regulations passed in Texas, which affected clinics that perform abortions there, were set to go into effect on Sept. 1. On Friday, a federal judge blocked those regulations, on the grounds that they unconstitutionally restricted access to legal abortion.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Governing
5:27 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Legal Questions Loom As Obama Weighs Military Action In Syria

President Obama says he agrees that Congress should have buy-in on military intervention against the Islamic State.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

The White House is working behind the scenes to develop a strategy for fighting the Islamic State in Syria, a strategy that could include airstrikes and other military action there. But there are already lots of questions in political and national security circles about the legal authority the Obama administration might use to justify those actions.

In the days after the Sept. 11 attacks, Congress authorized the White House to use military force — broad authority to strike against al-Qaida.

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Education
4:44 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

New Orleans Enters The Charter School Era

Ninth graders at George Washington Carver Collegiate Academy learn to shake hands and greet each other during the first day of school in New Orleans.
Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Originally published on Sat August 30, 2014 11:53 am

On Aug. 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina ripped through New Orleans and gutted most of its public schools. Even before the storm, the district was one of the most troubled in the nation.

Today, the New Orleans school system is unlike any other anywhere in the U.S. More than 9 in 10 students this fall are attending charter schools run by dozens of private, nonprofit organizations. Families choose the schools their children will attend, and the neighborhood school is a thing of the past.

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Politics
4:29 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

Climate Policy Takes The Stage In Florida Governor's Race

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

Florida is getting ready for an unusual governor's race. Like incumbent Rick Scott, a Republican, Charlie Crist is running for a second term as governor. In his first term, Crist was also a Republican.

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This Week's Must Read
4:29 pm
Fri August 29, 2014

In An Earthquake, History Fuels One Writer's Anxiety

San Francisco on fire in the aftermath of the 1906 earthquake.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 29, 2014 8:40 pm

While most of America is thinking burgers and swimming this Labor Day weekend, I can't stop thinking about earthquakes.

Last Sunday, a shaker registering magnitude 6.0 struck the Napa Valley in Northern California. It injured dozens and caused about $1 billion in damages. National media coverage focused on how the quake affected the area's famous wine industry — because America needs to know that our stock of cabs and zinfandels is safe.

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