Indiana Schools Increasingly Rely On Ballot Referenda For Funds

Nov 4, 2016

Indiana school districts are increasingly reliant upon voter approval for additional funding for specific projects.
Credit Nathan Gibbs / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nathangibbs/

School districts around the state, including Clinton Central, are posing nine different referenda on ballots.

These ballot measures are becoming an important part of school funding.

School referenda became a common practice after 2008, when the legislature put caps on the amount of property taxes that could be collected.

Because property taxes were a huge revenue stream for school districts, many schools were put in a tough place financially.

School referenda can be posed to fund specific construction projects, like renovating a specific school, or more commonly these days, to help fund the overall budget for the district.

Typically, referenda posed during May primaries have a better chance of passing.

This is probably because in May, more of the voters are drawn to the polls to vote specifically on the question.

In November, people are focused on many other races, and might not research the ballot question.        

For more information about all referenda questions in the state, and to calculate how much your taxes would increase if a referenda question in your district passes, visit stateimpactindiana.org.

School districts around the state, including Clinton Central, are posing nine different referenda on ballots.

These ballot measures are becoming an important part of school funding.

School referenda became a common practice after 2008, when the legislature put caps on the amount of property taxes that could be collected.

Because property taxes were a huge revenue stream for school districts, many schools were put in a tough place financially.

School referenda can be posed to fund specific construction projects, like renovating a specific school, or more commonly these days, to help fund the overall budget for the district.

Typically, referenda posed during May primaries have a better chance of passing.

This is probably because in May, more of the voters are drawn to the polls to vote specifically on the question.

In November, people are focused on many other races, and might not research the ballot question.        

For more information about all referenda questions in the state, and to calculate how much your taxes would increase if a referenda question in your district passes, visit stateimpactindiana.org.