Stan Jastrzebski

News Director

Stan Jastrzebski has spent a career in radio, with postings as News Director of NPR member stations WFSU in Tallahassee, Fla. and WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., and time as a reporter at WGN Radio in Chicago and WIBC Radio in Indianapolis. 

Stan holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University and has won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Indiana Broadcasters Association. 

He spends his time away from the newsroom with his wife and daughter and enjoys board games, tennis and trivia competitions.

Ways to Connect

courtesy Purdue Center for the Human-Animal Bond

Purdue University researchers are preparing to embark on a study showing whether dogs help ease the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers.

Previous research has relied mostly on anecdotal evidence showing pets calm their humans and make them happier.

But Purdue human-animal interaction professor Maggie O’Haire says her team will take a number of extra steps, including measuring levels of the stress hormone cortisol and getting in touch with participants at times they won’t expect.

courtesy Mayors National Climate Change Agenda

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has joined a growing group of municipal leaders opposed to Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

Dennis says he has joined a group of more than 200 so-called “Climate Mayors” nationwide, who’ve pledged their cities will uphold environmental regulations, even as the President seeks to escape them.

Dennis says he disagrees with assertions from Trump and many other Republicans that environmental rules are job-killers.

City of West Lafayette

The summer construction season is now in full force and you, the listeners to WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, have many questions about it.

This week, we put those to West Lafayette’s John Dennis and ask him whether he’s surprised that a project as talked about as State Street is still creating as much consternation as it is.

Also on this week’s program, will West Lafayette join the list of hundreds of other cities standing opposed to President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate change agreement?

courtesy Indiana Black Legislative Caucus

Members of the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus will kick off a series of meetings later this month aimed, in part, at convincing Hoosiers that similar issues affect rural and urban areas of the state.

And, says caucus member Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis), the meetings are a way to work across the aisle, too.

“We’re talking about things that would benefit everyone – that are good for everyone – that the conservative side actually authored a lot of this legislation,” Shackleford says.

cycleluxembourg / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cycleluxembourg/

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night is expected to conduct a second reading of an ordinance creating an advisory committee which would be charged with making the city’s streets safer for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Lafayette has begun evicting some residents from low-income housing just south of the city’s downtown.

That’s because those homes are slated to be razed and replaced with new townhomes.

It’s all part of Mayor Tony Roswarski’s strategy to increase population density near downtown – an area that still doesn’t have a grocery store.

But could such a move be made to help the city’s dilapidated north end, which is home to run-down houses and Lafayette’s highest crime rate?

courtesy Purdue University

Purdue researchers are partnering with Microsoft and scientists at three other universities around the globe to determine whether they’ve found a way to create a stable form of what’s known as “quantum computing.”

A new five-year agreement aims to build a type of system that could perform computations that are currently impossible in a short timespan, even for supercomputers.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

When, earlier this week, a train derailed in downtown Crawfordsville, it brought to a head some of the concerns Mayor Todd Barton has lodged with the railroads that crisscross his city.

Sure, the tracks caused regular traffic jams before, and city leaders have long hoped for a railroad relocation project, but was this week’s incident the locomotive that broke the camel’s back?

We talk about that incident on this week’s Ask The Mayor program.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

It’s no secret what the biggest topic is on this edition of WBAA’s Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels.

We could easily have filled the whole show with the many lingering questions about Purdue’s deal to buy online educator Kaplan University.

We won’t, but we will ask Purdue’s leader why the deal doesn’t include provisos mandating more transparency, whether he was prepared for the backlash he’s received and whether that backlash creates more possibility that any of the agencies which still have to sign off on the deal will instead put the kibosh on it.

Steve Burns / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Following reports of falsified appointment books at a Peru, Indiana Veterans’ Affairs clinic, two of the state’s U.S. House members want answers.

Former Veterans’ Affairs committee member Jackie Walorski (R-2nd) and current member Jim Banks (R-3rd) signed a letter wanting to know why one medical professional at the Peru clinic reported serving many more patients than she actually saw.

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