Stan Jastrzebski

News Director

Stan Jastrzebski has spent a career in radio, with postings as News Director of NPR member stations WFSU in Tallahassee, Fla. and WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., and time as a reporter at WGN Radio in Chicago and WIBC Radio in Indianapolis. 

Stan holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University and has won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Indiana Broadcasters Association. 

He spends his time away from the newsroom with his wife and daughter and enjoys board games, tennis and trivia competitions.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This will sound strange, but living in Indiana most of the last 20 years, I'm no stranger to earthquakes.

And yet, as I prepared to cover the Foster Farms Bowl here in Santa Clara, CA, I didn't even think of the possibility of temblors.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

A funny thing happened when Purdue President Mitch Daniels wrote a recent editorial for the Washington Post. The article came with the headline: “Is anyone ever wrong anymore,” and hundreds of commenters on the websites of various papers that ran the opinion piece tossed the question back at the former governor and appointee of the Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush administrations.

Courtesy Indiana Senate Republicans

A polarizing figure in the Indiana Senate will step down after the new year.

Republican Brandt Hershman (R-Buck Creek) will resign just before the legislative session gets underway, to follow his wife to Washington, D.C., where both are taking new jobs.

City of Frankfort

It’s been a year of turmoil for Frankfort city government.

The State Board of Accounts is investigating possible embezzlement by a former parks director.

The city has had to raise rates for both its electric service and water utility. And now a water filtration plant either needs a costly retrofit or a funeral.

And the city continues to struggle with the same sorts of drug problems many Indiana towns have – to the point where the local high school is planning random drug testing.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As West Lafayette and Purdue leaders previewed 2018 construction along State Street Wednesday, one question hung over their presentation: can the new road, with its increased congestion, take the strain it’ll face when several nearby roads close next year?

Traffic signals along the road are not currently responsive to traffic fluctuations. Don Petersen, one of the Purdue representatives on the Joint Board overseeing the project, declined to say whether that would help the several traffic jams the road now sees every day.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A ten-county area of West Central Indiana is about to get a nearly $40 million investment from the Lilly Endowment aimed at making farming and related industries more internet-compatible.

The cash is going to the Wabash Heartland Innovation Network, or WHIN (pronounced “win”), which will send the cash to Purdue University as research seed money.

WHIN, which includes Purdue President Mitch Daniels and several Purdue trustees, will send the cash to the school’s Birck Nanotechnology Center, where much of the research will be done.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we reflect on 2017 with Lafayette’s Tony Roswarski.

His city has finished some major construction projects, is waiting on some others and is dealing with public comments about both, including that flooding along the newly redone Main Street has gotten worse, not better.

Also, we talk about the ongoing debate over affordable housing in the city. Roswarski and other official opposed one plan for more low-income housing on the city’s south side, but the project’s developer simply moved to another site that didn’t require rezoning.

City of West Lafayette

The construction may be done for the season along West Lafayette’s State Street, but questions about road work are not.

This week, on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we chat with West Lafayette’s John Dennis about road construction going on in several places and whether it’s trampling both travel times and flower beds.

Also on this week’s program, the Tippecanoe County Commissioners have approved a one-year extension of the county’s syringe exchange program, which Mayor Dennis was for before he was against it.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

By the slimmest of margins, Tippecanoe County’s needle exchange program will survive for at least one more year.

A 2-1 vote by the county commissioners Monday came down only after Commissioner David Byers – who’d declined for weeks to state his stance publicly – voted in favor of a continuance.

Byers says he was swayed by talking to other commissioners at a recent state conference and by listening closely to public comment at Monday’s meeting from those who are unhappy about the exchange operating in a residential neighborhood in Lafayette.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

It’s been more than two years since Crawfordsville was named one of the winners of Indiana’s Stellar Communities grant program.

In that time, there’s been a lot of planning, but not a lot of construction.

Mayor Todd Barton says 2018 will see much of that building get underway, but there are still a few priorities which appear behind schedule.