Stan Jastrzebski

News Director

Stan Jastrzebski has spent a career in radio, with postings as News Director of NPR member stations WFSU in Tallahassee, Fla. and WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., and time as a reporter at WGN Radio in Chicago and WIBC Radio in Indianapolis. 

Stan holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University and has won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Indiana Broadcasters Association. 

He spends his time away from the newsroom with his wife and daughter and enjoys board games, tennis and trivia competitions.

Ways to Connect

Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA News

White County officials are advising Brookston residents to beware of scammers as cleanup continues from last week’s storm.

County Emergency Management Director Chantel Henson says even while the roads into and out of town were closed last week, both reputable insurance adjusters and dishonest fraudsters posing as officers of FEMA tried to sneak into town.

Iker Merodio / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ikermerodio/4673992149

A Purdue University economist says he doesn’t think Indiana will feel much of an impact after voters in the United Kingdom elected to leave the European Union.

Jerry Lynch is a former interim dean of Purdue’s Krannert School of Management and says the state and its businesses will have to take a wait-and-see approach.

“It’s not going to be dire," Lynch says. "It has the potential, depending on the kind of agreements that get negotiated, of slowing down world growth in the economy. And if world growth slows down, Indiana is affected by it, there’s no question at all.”

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

As if there aren’t enough orange construction barrels on Indiana roads, drivers should brace for more.

Repairing roads was the priority this year when state lawmakers voted to return local income tax dollars to cities, towns and counties across the state.

How The Cash Can Be Spent

Seventy-five percent of the money must be spent on roads.

Lawmakers allowed local governments to spend the remaining quarter of the money they’re getting back on a non-road project or to put it away for future use.

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

It appears the money is about to start flowing in to fund the improvements Crawfordsville touted to win one of last year’s Stellar Communities designations.

But there are still some kinks to work out, like: don’t you have to own land before you can build on it?

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we get an update on the city’s bank account and its construction progress from Todd Barton.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Mitch Daniels came into the Purdue presidency vowing to stay away from politics as he pursued a job in academic administration.

But when you’re arguably the most popular Republican in a red state, and when conservative columnists regularly call for your return to partisan life, it can be hard to stick to such proclamations.

Autumn / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/skywide/3213864391

The new chairman of the Purdue Senate Friday opened his term in office by calling for more transparency from the Purdue Board of Trustees and school administrators.

Biology professor David Sanders, who’s also a Democratic member of the West Lafayette City Council, used the Jewish parable of the “red heifer” – in which a Rabbi explains what Sanders calls a “strange tradition” to a pagan -- to gently admonish the Trustees to publicly address not just what’s good about Purdue, but what needs improvement, as well.

City of Frankfort

It’s no secret Indiana has a drug problem. Many cities and town have been racked with drug crime, overdoses and increased incidence of the diseases that are shared through contact with dirty needles.

But this month, Frankfort leaders got news that their problem may be continuing to worsen. This week on Ask The Mayor, we chat with Chris McBarnes about what his limited resources allow him to do about it.

Lafayette Mayor's Office

Much has already been written about Lafayette revamping its downtown Main Street this year – a project aimed at beautification and at luring more business to the area.

But this week on Ask The Mayor, we find out whether certain business owners are getting more bang for their buck than others are the new amenities are installed.

Also on this week's show: Amtrak officials are in Lafayette today to talk about improvements to the Hoosier State line.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

With almost half the state’s funding for the Hoosier State rail line exhausted, leaders Thursday tried to rally support for increasing the frequency of the trains – even though they have no clue how they’ll pay for it.

A special train, run by Iowa Pacific between Indianapolis and Lafayette, sought to gin up interest for, as Iowa Pacific CEO Ed Ellis put it, as many as 15 trains a day along the route.

John Pickerill / Facebook

A week after he announced he was stepping down as head of the Montgomery County Republican Party, John Pickerill now says he’ll run for the Indiana House.

Pickerill says he'll seek the Libertarian nomination to run against House Ways and Means Chairman Tim Brown.

The party's state committee will decide those nominations in two weeks.

Pickerill unseated an incumbent chairman three years ago by a single vote.

Since then, he's been battling rivals within the party who he charges haven't followed a true conservative line.

Pages