Stan Jastrzebski

News Director

Stan Jastrzebski has spent a career in radio, with postings as News Director of NPR member stations WFSU in Tallahassee, Fla. and WFIU in Bloomington, Ind., and time as a reporter at WGN Radio in Chicago and WIBC Radio in Indianapolis. 

Stan holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Northwestern University and has won awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press, Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, the Radio Television Digital News Association and the Indiana Broadcasters Association. 

He spends his time away from the newsroom with his wife and daughter and enjoys board games, tennis and trivia competitions.

Ways to Connect

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton has made visits this month to businesses granted tax abatements by the city.

It’s normal – required, in many cases – for some sort of check-in to happen, but on this week’s Ask The Mayor, we find out whether Mayor Barton thinks changes that could be afoot in the coming years thanks to Stellar Cities money may change the way the city looks at abatements.

Also on this week’s show, we check back in on the progress of the reconstituted Crawfordsville Human Rights Commission.

Neil Conway / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/3792906411

Numbers recently made available on an Indiana State Department of Health website show a significant increase in the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease among Hoosiers.

In 2011, just more than 2,000 Alzheimer’s deaths were recorded in Indiana. But in 2015 – the most recent year with state data – that figure had climbed by more than a quarter, to more than 2,500.

City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we offer some helpful hints to budding entrepreneurs, including this one: If you want a city to give you a tax abatement, there are a few key words you can use to describe that investment you want to make.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

IU Health faces a number of challenges as it takes over operation of Frankfort Hospital, and new facility president Kelly Braverman says she’s not sure what she’ll address first – facilities or services.

“Kind of chicken-and-egg, maybe, a little bit," Braverman says. "What I would say is that we are going to do an assessment of the community needs, understand what the volumes are, and what services the community needs. That is the baseline information that you need to figure out what you need the building to be able to provide.”

courtesy Purdue Center for the Human-Animal Bond

Purdue University researchers are preparing to embark on a study showing whether dogs help ease the effects of post-traumatic stress disorder in soldiers.

Previous research has relied mostly on anecdotal evidence showing pets calm their humans and make them happier.

But Purdue human-animal interaction professor Maggie O’Haire says her team will take a number of extra steps, including measuring levels of the stress hormone cortisol and getting in touch with participants at times they won’t expect.

courtesy Mayors National Climate Change Agenda

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis has joined a growing group of municipal leaders opposed to Donald Trump’s removal of the United States from the Paris Climate Accord.

Dennis says he has joined a group of more than 200 so-called “Climate Mayors” nationwide, who’ve pledged their cities will uphold environmental regulations, even as the President seeks to escape them.

Dennis says he disagrees with assertions from Trump and many other Republicans that environmental rules are job-killers.

City of West Lafayette

The summer construction season is now in full force and you, the listeners to WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, have many questions about it.

This week, we put those to West Lafayette’s John Dennis and ask him whether he’s surprised that a project as talked about as State Street is still creating as much consternation as it is.

Also on this week’s program, will West Lafayette join the list of hundreds of other cities standing opposed to President Trump’s decision to pull the U.S. out of the Paris climate change agreement?

courtesy Indiana Black Legislative Caucus

Members of the Indiana Black Legislative Caucus will kick off a series of meetings later this month aimed, in part, at convincing Hoosiers that similar issues affect rural and urban areas of the state.

And, says caucus member Robin Shackleford (D-Indianapolis), the meetings are a way to work across the aisle, too.

“We’re talking about things that would benefit everyone – that are good for everyone – that the conservative side actually authored a lot of this legislation,” Shackleford says.

cycleluxembourg / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cycleluxembourg/

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night is expected to conduct a second reading of an ordinance creating an advisory committee which would be charged with making the city’s streets safer for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Lafayette has begun evicting some residents from low-income housing just south of the city’s downtown.

That’s because those homes are slated to be razed and replaced with new townhomes.

It’s all part of Mayor Tony Roswarski’s strategy to increase population density near downtown – an area that still doesn’t have a grocery store.

But could such a move be made to help the city’s dilapidated north end, which is home to run-down houses and Lafayette’s highest crime rate?

Pages