Sarah Fentem

Reporter

Sarah comes to WBAA from Bloomington, where she worked as a reporter and producer for NPR affiliate WFIU and its sister PBS station, WTIU while completing her master's degree at Indiana University. Her responsibilities at WBAA include pitching stories and project ideas, writing and producing dayturns and longer features, serving as an on-air host and newscaster and basically doing whatever her editor Stan tells her to do. She reports indiscriminately, but she has a soft spot for stories about agribusiness, city infrastructure, the environment and scientific research. 

Sarah's dream is to one day win an award for having the world's cleanest refrigerator. However, she is 100 percent more likely to win the "Most Likely To Wreck The Mood At A Karaoke Bar By Singing A Bummer Song By Bob Seeger And The Silver Bullet Band" award.

linkedin

On his first day of office, Governor Eric Holcomb signed an executive order creating an Executive Director of Drug Prevention, Treatment and Enforcement.

The new director, Jim McClelland, is a former CEO of Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana. He takes a firm stance that addiction should be understood to be an illness.

In his new role, he will coordinate drug-related efforts across state agencies such as the state health department and the Family and Social Services Administration.

Sarah Fentem / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Carolyn Kelso and her husband Robert live in a big house north of Indianapolis, with original paintings on the wall and furry throws on the furniture. Carolyn herself is 71, with short blonde hair and stylish chunky black glasses. 

She and her husband take their health seriously, and her mother suffered from Alzheimer’s, so she noticed right away when something was wrong.

“I’d get to the car and go down to the corner, and couldn’t remember where I was going, couldn’t remember if I was going left or right,” Carolyn Kelso says.

Trey Pennington / https://www.flickr.com/photos/treypennington/

Eric Holcomb has signed an executive order creating a position within his office to oversee all state agencies involved with drug prevention and treatment efforts.

Retired Goodwill Industries of Central Indiana CEO Jim McClelland will serve as the new Director for Drug Prevention, Treatment and Enforcement. In that role, he’ll be in charge of overseeing the drug-related efforts of nine Indiana agencies, including the Department of Health, the Professional Licensing Agency and the Family and Social Services Administration.

Steve Burns / WTIU

Tippecanoe County officials may be coalescing around the idea of using a mobile unit to house the county’s recently-approved syringe services program.

Ed Schipul / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eschipul/

Workplace injuries fell 5 percent in 2015 in Indiana. The year is now tied with 2013 as the year with the lowest on-the-job injury rate since the federal government began recording 25 years ago.

According to the Indiana Department of Labor, 3.8 people per every hundred were injured or contracted work-related illnesses last year.

Robert S. Donovan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/booleansplit/

According to the Indiana Department of Labor, the injury and illness rate of the state’s agricultural workers increased almost 30 percent between 2014 and 2015. But the numbers—from the state’s annual Survey of Occupational Illnesses and Injuries—don’t tell the whole story.

Wikimedia Commons / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Medicine#/media/File:Stress_test.jpg

Even though many Hoosiers will be facing increased prices and fewer options on the Affordable Care Act’s federal health insurance exchange next year, Indiana’s enrollment for 2017 is still up by more than 9 thousand people.

According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 119 thousand Hoosiers have signed up for insurance on healthcare.gov for coverage beginning January 1, a nearly 9 percent increase.

whitehouse.gov / https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2016/12/12/3-letters-explain-why-president-obama-signing-cures-act

State health officials say it’s too soon to tell how Indiana will spend the cash it’s slated to get from a federal bill aimed at fighting opioid abuse.

President Obama recently signed the 21st Century Cures Act, which, among other initiatives, will direct a billion dollars to states for use in opioid treatment programs.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/takomabibelot/2627161575

Indiana regularly falls in the bottom when it comes to state health rankings—with groups from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to Wallethub finding the state one of the least healthy in the nation. However, a recent ranking placing the state 46th for older Americans’ health raises questions about ranking systems’ conflicts of interest.

Charlotte Cooper (edited) / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cecooper/

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky has seen donations increase 25-fold in the weeks following this year’s elections.

Before the election, the group received approximately 80 donations a week. For the last four weeks, the average has been closer to 2000 a week.

President-elect Donald Trump has said he would appoint a Supreme Court judge who would be likely to oppose Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion. Trump’s vice presidential pick, Indiana Governor Mike Pence, has a history of signing anti-abortion legislation into law.

Pages