Nick Schenkel

Contributor

Nick Schenkel is the director of the West Lafayette Public Library, and reviews books from all walks of literature.

Ways to Connect

Many presidents tend to fade into seclusion after their tenure in the White House, but George W. Bush has brought his post-presidency hobby to the public's attention. An avid painter, he decided to create portraits of American war veterans and service members, to commemorate the sacrifices they made for their country. The paintings are accompanied by stories that give insight to the veteran's personal lives, with Bush's comments on his time spent with them. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Native American life is largely characterized by stereotypes when looking from the outside in, ignoring the unique cultures that truly exist. Author Kent Nerburn has immersed himself into Native American communities, learning about their beliefs and values, and understanding how their perspective differs from Western culture. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Although globalization has brought Easterners and Westerners closer, differences in culture are still stark. The focus of the self, business practices, and education are just a few ways the two sides of the globe seem to split. Author Gish Jen has constructed this week's feature with cultural psychology research and personal anecdotes to bring light to how the culture gap can be understood and ultimately appreciated. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

One of the largest marches in recent history, the Women's March in January 2017 was an international event. Spanning two days, women, men, and children marched in all seven continents to support minority rights and equality. This week's feature is a collection of full-color photos, telling the stories of the individuals who were part of the movement. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

To celebrate National Poetry Month in April, this week's features showcase two collections of prose by female authors. Carrie Newcomer, a beloved singer-songwriter based in Indiana, released an insider-look into her writing process and inspirations in A Permeable Life. And Lynn Emmanuel, a prominent poet, has collected pieces from her other collections and formed The Nerve of It. ​West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

From local author Carmen Pascal Fabian, this week's feature follows the lives of two peasants from rural Italy as they maneuver through the rule of Mussolini. A tale of love and loss, distance and reunion, The Long Years brings a history-rich plot to the age-old story of true love. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

While the universe seems like a large and fearful place, humans have come to understand more and more about what lies beyond the atmosphere in recent history. Known for their understandable prose, this week's feature is written by three famous astrophysicists who aim to get readers excited for the complicated world outside our own. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

British author Ali Smith has released a collection of short stories that explore the power of words and the books that contain them. Fictional characters delve into the meaning of libraries and language in their own personal ways, tying together the importance of preserving places of learning. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Not only were Jews and other minority groups of people victims of World War II pillaging, but culturally-significant items were blacklisted as well. The thousands of books burned during the 1930's by Nazi Germany was among the most significant acts of censorship by a government to date. This week's feature follows historians that are now trying to piece together the routes surviving books have taken, highlighting the families that finally receive books belonging to relatives past. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

This week's feature highlights the autobiographical tale of John Lewis, a prominent civil rights activist in the twentieth century. Written as a graphic novel, March follows Lewis' life throughout the 1960's and into his prominence as a US Congressman. It is the first of a trilogy completed in August 2016. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

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