Nick Schenkel

Contributor

Nick Schenkel is the director of the West Lafayette Public Library, and reviews books from all walks of literature.

Ways to Connect

This week's feature takes readers through the canals of Venice, traveling from past to present and back again. A hunchback man finds himself in the city after being sent on a mysterious quest from a woman he believes he loves, all the while envisioning how various people from the distant past experienced those same streets. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Though the Ilyiad is well-known, this week's feature delves deeper into the timeless tale. Highlighting the devastating consequences of war in eloquence, author Caroline Alexander combines the meticulous accuracy of a historian with the fluid narrative of a writer. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

The concept of pretty is changing as women and girls are empowered to take on the world fearlessly in their unique ways. Photographer Kate Parker captures the individuality of girls and their own definitions of "pretty" in this week's feature, displaying each of them actively in their personal endeavors. From ages three to 18, the subjects of her photos define what strong is for the coming generations. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

This week's feature revisits author Mark Kurlansky, with a new travel log depicting Cuba's capital. With vivid descriptions and observations of the city's social scene, Kurlansky paints Havana as romantic and rich in its historic ties. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Living in the woods as a hermit seems like a fictional tale, but this week's feature describes a true story from the wilderness of Maine. Chris Knight, a hermit living alone for 27 years, was finally exposed after breaking into nearby homes to steal food. Journalist Michael Finkel found him after his arrest, and crafted a biography of Knight's extraordinary life. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Though usually thought of as rustic and unsuitable for 21st century life, log houses in the US and Europe have been long embraced by esteemed architects as works of art. Accompanied by Radek Kurzaj's beautiful photos, author Richard Olsen takes readers through the history of some of the most spectacular designs in the log cabin world. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

This week's feature explores the concept of mercy, and how it can be incorporated in our lives. Starting by showing mercy to ourselves, we can transform the way we interact and relate to one another. Though a book for and about Christians, author Anne Lamott draws on wisdom from a wide variety of spiritual and intellectual figures to show mercy as an integral piece of the human experience. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

With a bee population that continues to decline of late, the fruits and vegetables grown to feed the world may be in jeopardy. The Xerces Society works to encourage the general public to reincorporate bees into their lives, and have released a guide to plants that can attract them. With a lengthy index and detailed information about each plant, gardeners all over the country can find things to grow that are native to their region. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Renowned author Michael Chabon explores the life of his terminally-ill grandfather in this week's feature. Through his adventurous tales, ranging from love and marriage to space shuttles, Chabon's grandfather toes the line between extraordinary and fantasy. Leaving readers wondering what is real and what is not, Moonglow paints a deathbed confession in a whimsical light. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

A tale of teenage love and loss, this week's feature explores small-town life in the Midwest and a family navigating through it. A tragic accident takes the life of Dru Ann's love, and her spiral of grief trickles into the lives of everyone around her. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

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