Nick Schenkel

Contributor

Nick Schenkel is the director of the West Lafayette Public Library, and reviews books from all walks of literature.

Ways to Connect

From local author Carmen Pascal Fabian, this week's feature follows the lives of two peasants from rural Italy as they maneuver through the rule of Mussolini. A tale of love and loss, distance and reunion, The Long Years brings a history-rich plot to the age-old story of true love. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

While the universe seems like a large and fearful place, humans have come to understand more and more about what lies beyond the atmosphere in recent history. Known for their understandable prose, this week's feature is written by three famous astrophysicists who aim to get readers excited for the complicated world outside our own. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

British author Ali Smith has released a collection of short stories that explore the power of words and the books that contain them. Fictional characters delve into the meaning of libraries and language in their own personal ways, tying together the importance of preserving places of learning. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Not only were Jews and other minority groups of people victims of World War II pillaging, but culturally-significant items were blacklisted as well. The thousands of books burned during the 1930's by Nazi Germany was among the most significant acts of censorship by a government to date. This week's feature follows historians that are now trying to piece together the routes surviving books have taken, highlighting the families that finally receive books belonging to relatives past. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

This week's feature highlights the autobiographical tale of John Lewis, a prominent civil rights activist in the twentieth century. Written as a graphic novel, March follows Lewis' life throughout the 1960's and into his prominence as a US Congressman. It is the first of a trilogy completed in August 2016. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Attention to detail is a gift usually reserved for fictitious characters like Sherlock Holmes, but this week's feature gives you the skills to hone your abilities in real life. Using over 70 pieces of artwork to illustrate detail, author Amy Herman explores how being more observant can improve almost any part of your life. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Contemporary Cambodia is the product of a rich but tumultuous history that dates back hundreds of years. Through a thriving civilization to a fairly recent genocide, Cambodians are rebuilding to become better understood by the world around them. This week's feature includes two books on the history and destinations of Cambodia and neighboring Laos, both written by author David Chandler. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Book Review: Lit Up

Feb 17, 2017

David Denby, acclaimed writer for The New Yorker, sat in classrooms for an entire academic year to see if literature was really dead with the Millennial youth. He read the books and poems that were assigned, and witnessed the students discuss each piece. What he discovered was that the passion for reading still can be ignited - with the help of great teachers and great literature. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Widely viewed as one of the most controversial (or least effective) presidents of all time, Herbert Hoover is often overlooked in US history. But, despite his public image, Hoover gave much of life to service in the federal government outside his four-year reign. This week's book review looks at Herbert Hoover as a whole - the man before, during, and after the presidency. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Author Karen Maezen Miller explores the "Zenness" of the natural world in this week's feature. After she and her family find a home with an old garden in the backyard, she uses its contents to discover lessons in forgiveness, presence, acceptance, and more. For gardeners and spectators alike, the natural world can provide a window into Zen that may normally be overlooked. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

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