Emilie Syberg

Reporter / Morning Edition Host

On November 27, 2017, we welcomed Emilie Syberg to the WBAA family. Emilie has recently returned to the states, after participating in the Peace Corps from June 2014 to August of 2016, where she worked as an English teacher in Zambia. After attending grad school for Journalism at Northwestern University, Emilie joined WBAA as a Morning Show Host and Reporter. Emilie is passionate about the morning show series because she believes it is a great way to start your day. As a reporter, Emilie enjoys that the process of reporting one feature can blossom into a series of stories. In the future she is looking forward to reporting on the issues that are affecting low income families and individuals. In her free time, she enjoys spending time with her family, visiting museums, and is an avid news junkie. WBAA is excited to have Emilie Syberg as a part of our team and we look forward to seeing what she has in store for the future.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Lafayette’s Food Finders Food Bank is partnering with CityBus this summer to deliver fresh produce to ten sites throughout the city. The initiative supplements the food supplies low-income families need during a tough time of year: the summer break from school.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Prince Harry is marrying the American actress Meghan Markle in Windsor, England, almost 4,000 miles away from downtown Indianapolis. But at the Circle City's Skyline Club, more than 80 people have gathered to see the ceremony, reflect on the deeper meaning of the union...and drink mimosas.

On every widescreen TV in the room, at 7 a.m. Eastern Time and 1 p.m. Greenwich Mean Time, Markle emerges from a Rolls Royce and onto the steps of St. George’s Chapel beneath a 16-foot long wedding veil.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

On Saturday mornings between May and October, a crowd converges on downtown Lafayette to visit the Lafayette Farmer's Market.

Though it doesn’t take them yet, it’s one of 75 markets in Indiana officially authorized to accept benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

SHERIFF'S RACE

West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski is one step closer to holding the highest law enforcement position in Tippecanoe County.

Dombkowski easily defeated incumbent Sheriff Barry Richard and Sheriff’s Department Lieutenant John “Woody” Ricks Tuesday night, garnering almost 50-percent of the vote.

Dombkowski says he believes the specific issues he outlined in his campaign inspired residents to go to the polls.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

More than three hundred students protested at West Lafayette High School today as part of the National School Walkout. Friday marked the 19th anniversary of the shooting at Colorado’s Columbine High School. Student organizers conceived and planned the event, and adults stayed on the sidelines to do one thing: listen.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Gia Bradford has some words of hard-earned advice she’d give her freshman year self, if she could.

“I would take the SATs earlier,” says Bradford.

Bradford is a senior at West Lafayette High School. She and her fellow seniors are in the last months of their high school careers, so they’re starting to relax a little. But the past four years haven’t been worry-free.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Governor Eric Holcomb officially anointed the Say’s firefly the state insect of Indiana today at a bill signing at West Lafayette’s Cumberland Elementary School. 

Cumberland students dressed in bright colors and flashed glowing lights in the darkened gymnasium, emulating the newly-minted state insect. Parents, teachers, and even entomologists gathered to watch the bill take flight.

Andrew Hancock / Purdue University

6:20 p.m. update:

Purdue President Mitch Daniels has released the following statement regarding Sumire Negishi’s death:

“Purdue University and the world have lost a dear friend in the death of Sumire Negishi. Throughout a lifetime of love and loyalty, she supported her husband in a career of tremendous contributions to science and to the teaching and training of subsequent generations of top scientists.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

It’s now illegal to vape, or smoke an electronic cigarette – in most public places in Lafayette. One local vaping shop believes smoking traditional cigarettes and vaping shouldn’t be conflated.

Vaping devices heat “e-liquids” containing nicotine—the amount of which can be customized—and flavors, like cinnamon or berry. Users produce large billows of vapor when exhaling. Zachary Gracer works at West Lafayette’s 7 Sins Vape shop, and says his customers are respectful.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

PART ONE: LOW WAGES AND A LONG WAITING LIST

Finding and keeping affordable housing can turn into an ongoing battle for many Hoosiers. If income is spent disproportionately on housing, that means less money spent on food, education, and medical expenses. The federal housing choice voucher program provides a way for individuals and families on the margins to afford rent and avoid an eviction, or even homelessness.

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