Chris Morisse Vizza

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Chris Morisse Vizza hosts  Morning Edition and reports for the WBAA News Department.

She earned a degree in communications from the University of Evansville and began her career as a reporter and newscaster at WASK in Lafayette.

Chris then joined WLFI-TV, where she worked 15 years as a reporter and 10 years as news director.

Most recently, she worked as a print and digital reporter for the Journal & Courier. 

She's also a 2010 inductee into the Indiana Associated Press Broadcast Association Hall of Fame.

Eric J Paparatto / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejpphoto/

Many Tippecanoe County homeowners will likely see an increase when their property tax bills arrive next month.

But County Auditor Bob Plantenga says some residents may see a slight decrease. 

The actual dollar amount will depend on where the property is located.

City of Frankfort

A Frankfort manufacturer decided not to expand its existing plant in Clinton County, instead choosing to build a new plant in Anderson, Indiana.

Mayor Chris McBarnes explains why the city lost out on the $100 million investment and the nearly 200 jobs the plant is expected to  create.

This week on WBAA's Ask The Mayor, we query McBarnes on what steps his community needs to take to ensure the city can compete for new employers and the jobs they bring.

By Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA News

State lawmakers, for a second year in a row, have clipped the wings of West Lafayette grade-school students who’ve been lobbying legislators to designate Say’s Firefly as the state insect.

Republican leaders in the Indiana House and Senate refused to hold hearings or vote on three bills that would recognize the species identified 190-years ago in New Harmony, Indiana by entomologist Thomas Say. 

The students say they’ll campaign for the firefly until state leaders see the light.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA Radio

Two different messages delivered just one day apart at Purdue University’s annual “Road School” appear to indicate a disconnect between Governor Eric Holcomb and Holcomb’s newly appointed Indiana Department of Transportation Commissioner Joe McGuinness.

McGuinness, who served five years as Mayor of Franklin, says he’s a local-minded person.

Robert Carr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/myconstructionphotos/1525875787/

Nearly 3,000 highway engineers and contractors are on the Purdue campus to learn the latest innovations in building cost-effective, long-lasting roads, highways and bridges.

But, before the technical workshops about pavement preservation and culvert installation began Tuesday, attendees heard from one of the men who is determining how to generate the more than $1 billion additional dollars needed in each of the next 20 years to shore up the state’s crumbling roads and bridges.  

Marc Magliari, Amtrak

Amtrak ramped up its services Wednesday when it resumed complete control of all facets of the Hoosier State train that runs eight times a week between Indianapolis and Chicago.

The arrival of Amtrak’s high profile dome car, food service, business class and free Wi-Fi signal local, state and federal leaders are focused on maintaining revenue gains achieved after the state hired a private contractor to market and improve the money-losing service.

Sparktography / https://www.flickr.com/people/sparktography/

While West Lafayette and Purdue University are focused on rebuilding State Street, one resident is asking city leaders to look at that project’s impact on another major road – Northwestern Avenue.

Jim Klatch says the new perimeter parkway designed to carry traffic around the heart of campus will increase traffic on Northwestern, particularly on the north end of Purdue’s campus, between Stadium Avenue and Cherry Lane.

Warsaw Community Schools / https://www.flickr.com/photos/95469015@N02/8707445809

The following school corporations are operating on a 2-hour delay due to fog on Wednesday, February 22, 2017:

Attica

Benton Community

Clinton Central

Covington Community Schools

flick.comphotos7776581, Nels Olsen

Court Appointed Special Advocates, or CASAs, in Tippecanoe County are learning to identify youths who are at-risk of becoming human trafficking victims. They’re also learning how to talk about the issue when red flags appear.

County CASA Executive Director Coleen Connor says human trafficking may not yet be a significant problem, locally. But she wants to prepare the volunteers for what’s likely to come in the future.

Carissa Rogers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/goodncrazy/5531939741

The Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission is slated to vote Wednesday on a significantly scaled-back proposal to regulate short-term home rentals, such as those offered on websites including Airbnb.

The original proposal would have restricted the number of days a property could be rented, regardless of whether the owner lives in the residence.

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