Charlotte Tuggle

Reporter

My name is Charlotte Tuggle and I'm a reporter at WBAA. For three years, I was a news intern at the station before graduating from Purdue and becoming a full-time staff member. During my last year as an intern, I was named the Indiana Student Journalist of the Year by the Society of Professional Journalists. I'm very excited to stay and work with such an honest, dedicated team here at WBAA!

J. Stephen Conn / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051857316/

Crawfordsville has been named a Stellar Communities grant recipient, but it’s not certain how much money the city will receive.

Mayor Todd Barton says the city wants $18 million to invest in a slate of proposed projects, but he says that’s the best case scenario.

Barton says the Lieutenant Governor’s office will now review funding for the proposed projects, but there’s still work to do before money starts coming to the city.

INDOT

4:30 p.m. Update:

INDOT now expects the bridge to be closed until mid-September.

The preliminary fix is to drive steel casings through the existing pier footings and deep into the soil.

But INDOT Deputy Commissioner Bob Alderman says that’s similar to the same process that caused the bridge to be unsafe – workers sinking a beam into an artesian well during last week’s construction work.

Alderman says water started pumping from the well into the ground around the bridge.

Max Anderson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/rexlibris/755989773/

Rossville students will attend a homeroom period this school year to learn about technological responsibility. Schools have also added three technology-centered courses.

The class addition came as part of Rossville Consolidated Schools’ technology program. New computers and tablets for K-12 students are to be distributed later this month. Teachers were required to attend training with the new computers this summer.

Superintendent James Hanna says the program aims to prepare students for a changing technological workplace.

Kevin Stanchfield / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sgt_spanky/9962445184/

The Crawfordsville American Legion plans to bring the Vietnam Traveling Memorial Wall back next August – if the post can raise the $10,000 or more officials think will be necessary.

With still a year before the Wall arrives, Post 72 member Mike Spencer says the rules for the event are already clear.

Spencer says there won’t be any commerce at the site and disrespectful behavior won’t be tolerated.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

INDOT is examining whether Walsh Construction’s actions may have played a factor in last week’s I-65 bridge closing.

INDOT Bridge Design Manager Jeremy Hunter says the sinking of the bridge that led to last week’s second closure came after Walsh inspectors deemed the bridge safe for travel.

“When we talked to Walsh, they had surveyed the pier and hadn’t recorded any settlement that we knew of at that time,” Hunter says. “And so, between the time that we installed those temporary supports and the time we closed the bridge on Friday, there had been substantial settlement.”

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

Crawfordsville’s and Frankfort’s incumbent mayors notched convincing wins in Tuesday’s primary election.

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton received four times as many votes as opponent Johnathan Pickett.

Barton says Crawfordsville voters remember the positive changes he’s made since taking office three years ago.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Only 31-percent of registered voters in Tippecanoe County actually voted in last year’s general election. That anemic turnout was still double what the primary election registered. Both elections were in keeping with similar trends at the state level.

The Greater Lafayette League of Women Voters, the Hanna Community Center and the group Citizens for Civil Rights are trying to address those worrying statistics by pondering an age-old problem: how to get young and minority voters more invested in politics.

Sara Westermark / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarawestermark/4415600385/

After eight years of declining revenue, the Clinton County Health Department may have to raise service fees to make up for its losses.

The Clinton County Council recently increased the department’s loan cap to $65,000 -- $15,000 more than what it was allowed to borrow at the beginning of this year.

Health Department Administrator John Brannan says the department is asking for more grants from the state before taking money from the community.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

After public outcry over the Religious Freedom Restoration Act and an attempt to satisfy LGBTQ groups didn’t hit the mark for everyone, Indiana will invest in a public relations firm to reshape its image.

The Indiana Economic Development Corporation and the Office of Tourism Development hired public relations firm Porter Novelli earlier this week.

Steve Baker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebiglens

  Law enforcement crisis training is closer to becoming a statewide requirement now that the House has passed a bill advising more funding for it.

Sen. Mark Stoops (D-Bloomington) says there isn’t currently enough training teaching police how to handle a crisis, such as a mental health issue or a diabetic attack. Stoops says the bill would make law enforcement communication safer and more effective.

“Treatment typically costs about a dollar for every six dollars we would’ve spent on incarceration. So it’s a very cost-effective approach as well,” Stoops says.

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