Charlotte Tuggle


My name is Charlotte Tuggle and I'm a reporter at WBAA. For three years, I was a news intern at the station before graduating from Purdue and becoming a full-time staff member. During my last year as an intern, I was named the Indiana Student Journalist of the Year by the Society of Professional Journalists. I'm very excited to stay and work with such an honest, dedicated team here at WBAA!

Noah Coffey /

West Lafayette representatives are condemning hate speech posted at a local church over the weekend.

Racial slurs and threatening language were displayed on posters tacked outside of the Unitarian Universalist Church.

Rep. Sheila Klinker (D-Lafayette) says she’s shocked and concerned, especially since the incident happened at night.

“They are doing this behind everyone’s back and will not admit that they’re doing it because they know most of the people in our area do not agree with this and certainly are not on their side,” Klinker says.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA


The computer science field is booming, yet women are still underrepresented within it. Research shows one reason is that girls are not as exposed to computer science in K-12 education. So universities are reaching out to schools to introduce computing earlier.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

West Lafayette officials believe the city has the money to build an indoor recreation center in Cumberland Park, but say they won’t sign off on the idea until it’s garnered enough community support.

A few dozen residents gave input at two Tuesday open houses. The goal was two-fold: ask whether residents want a rec center and gauge what amenities it’d need so people would buy memberships, says redevelopment commission chair Larry Oates.

“You’ve heard of Build-A-Bear, at the malls and stuff – this is our Build-A-Rec Center program,” Oates says.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Three out of every four Indiana jails are overcrowded, according to the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute.

The majority of sheriffs say their inmate population has increased significantly since the passage of a criminal code revision nearly four years ago. And some are trying to find local solutions before they’re hit with a lawsuit.

Purdue University

The failed summer camp/research study Camp DASH was flawed on several levels, according to a report by Purdue University’s office of ethics.

After violence and sexual misconduct was reported, the study was shut down and campers sent home.

An investigation, whose results were released Tuesday, determines the design of Camp DASH was “inadequate” and “suffered from a culture of non-compliance” with study protocols and University policies.

Susan /

Sixteen more families in the Lafayette area are set to receive affordable housing after a federal grant was awarded to the city’s housing authority.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Tenant Based Rental Assistance program will help those families with their rent.

Thomas Hawk /

A transgender inmate is suing the Indiana Department of Correction for denying her request for hormone therapy while in prison.

Anthony Loveday was diagnosed with gender dysphoria – conflict between a person’s physical gender and their gender identity -- while in prison, and says the Indiana State Prison’s denial to provide hormone therapy is unconstitutional.

Joshua Duffy /

Last week’s heavy rainfall has added more delays to Indiana’s corn harvest.

As of this week, 70-percent of the state’s corn has been harvested – that’s compared to 85-percent at this time last year. That’s even though, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wet conditions have forced farmers to focus on corn instead of completing soybean harvests.

Quinn Dombrowski /

The West Lafayette City Council approved plans Monday to set physical and operational boundaries for new businesses along the Wabash River.

The so-called “riverfront” district now expands past River Road, up State Street and along Fowler Avenue. The council voted to support applications for liquor licenses in the district so long as the business' sales are at least 67-percent food (i.e. not more than one-third alcohol) or it stays open no longer than from 11 a.m. to midnight.

Jim Hammer /

The Lafayette City Council is one step closer to approving a nearly 50-percent water rate increase, but officials say it’ll only make a few dollars’ difference on an average resident’s monthly bill.

After conducting a rate study, the city is moving forward with what officials are calling the Water System Capital Improvements Plan -- which argues the current water charges aren’t enough to cover costs of running and maintaining Lafayette’s wastewater utility.