Charlotte Tuggle

Reporter

My name is Charlotte Tuggle and I'm a reporter at WBAA. For three years, I was a news intern at the station before graduating from Purdue and becoming a full-time staff member. During my last year as an intern, I was named the Indiana Student Journalist of the Year by the Society of Professional Journalists. I'm very excited to stay and work with such an honest, dedicated team here at WBAA!

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

As the opioid epidemic rages on across the country, Indiana researchers are among those rethinking pain management.

But non-opioid medication has fallen short for those with chronic pain.

When you’re hurt, your nervous system sends a signal to your brain and you feel pain. Most pain medications mask the pain by blocking the receptors that cause you to feel it.

According to Richard van Rijn – a Purdue University medicinal chemist and molecular pharmacologist – the right type of medication depends on the type of pain. He says for chronic pain, it’s hard to find effective medication.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

SHERIFF'S RACE

West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski is one step closer to holding the highest law enforcement position in Tippecanoe County.

Dombkowski easily defeated incumbent Sheriff Barry Richard and Sheriff’s Department Lieutenant John “Woody” Ricks Tuesday night, garnering almost 50-percent of the vote.

Dombkowski says he believes the specific issues he outlined in his campaign inspired residents to go to the polls.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Tippecanoe County officials hope to start an addiction recovery program focusing on treating individuals while they’re in jail.

Inmates whose case is pending would apply to participate, then spend at least 90 days in a quarantined area where they’d receive intensive therapy, according to Dearborn County officials – who say their own such program has been a success.

Courtesy City of West Lafayette

The vacated building on the corner of State Street and Northwestern Avenue is on track to be replaced with apartments and a popular retail store.

The space – which now bears only a gutted neon sign of the bar it once housed and faded artwork featuring shadowy figures – has long been an eyesore, says West Lafayette Development Director Erik Carlson.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Whenever a gun control debate comes up, gun sales go up too. But Indiana firearms dealers say the sales jump after the recent March for Our Lives wasn’t as significant as what happened under the last presidential administration.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

FOR SHERIFF

The Republican candidates for Tippecanoe County Sheriff focused on the opioid crisis in their debate Tuesday night.

Multiple questions about the drug epidemic were posed to incumbent Sheriff Barry Richard, Lieutenant John ‘Woody’ Ricks and West Lafayette Police Chief Jason Dombkowski.

Richard pointed toward the jail’s existing program where volunteers seek to help inmates struggling with addiction.

Provided by Purdue University

Purdue University officially launched its controversial joint venture with what was formerly known as Kaplan University Monday. Officials say the newly-rebranded Purdue Global is targeted toward ‘working adults.’

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

A crowded pool of Republican candidates for the 4th district congressional seat met in Lafayette Saturday to debate issues ranging from gun control to federal spending and online security. The debate comes more than a month ahead of the May 8th primary.

Seven candidates are vying for the GOP nomination for what was previously Congressman Todd Rokita’s seat before he announced his run for Senate.

Eric Norris / flickr.com/photos/sfxeric/3964596491

West Lafayette is gearing up to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors – joining a long list of U.S. cities going after painkiller producers in the courtroom.

More than a dozen manufacturers are to be named in the lawsuit, including Johnson & Johnson, Allergan and Purdue Pharma. They’re some of the companies responsible for such drugs as Norco and Oxycontin. The city will allege those companies, in its words, “deceptively marketed” opioids.

Opiate distributors will also be named in the lawsuit, alleging those parties failed to report and stop high-quantity orders.

Tex Texin / flickr.com/photos/textexin/3612094774

In March, the Frankfort Police Department will begin to treat every drug overdose as a crime scene in an effort to find and convict drug dealers.

According to new overdose guidelines, officers will first respond to the overdose in a medical sense. And if an opioid was involved, they’ll administer the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

Then, officers will collect evidence and statements from the scene to help build criminal cases against drug dealers.

Deputy Chief Scott Shoemaker says he’s confident most victims won’t cooperate, so police will dig deeper.

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