Annie Ropeik

IPBS Economy Reporter

Annie Ropeik is the economy and business reporter for the Indiana Public Broadcasting network, based at WBAA. She’s covered farming, fisheries and other industries at public radio stations from Massachusetts and Delaware to Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, and earned accolades from the Alaska and Delaware Press Clubs for her reporting on rural business issues. Originally from Silver Spring, Md., Annie has a Hoosier mother and a degree in classics from Boston University. She also performs a mean car concert, boasts a worryingly encyclopedic knowledge of One Direction lyrics and is a Hufflepuff.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive

Subaru is cutting back on production and overtime at its Indiana factory to free up parts for a major recall.

The Japanese car-maker has to fix a steering problem in more than 50,000 new vehicles made recently at its only plant in North America.

The Lafayette factory employs more than 4,000 workers -- and thanks to the recall, as many as 3,000 of them may miss out on daily and Saturday overtime for the next few weeks.

Kate Holt/Africa Practice https://www.flickr.com/photos/dfataustralianaid

    

Top agronomists at Purdue University will be part of a new nationwide higher education task force on food security.

The Association of Public and Land Grant Universities is putting together the 31-member commission, which aims to ensure that the world's rapidly growing population has enough to eat.

It was funded by the Kellogg Foundation to devise research and public education ideas for improving food access and nutrition by 2050, when the global population is set to hit 9 billion.

Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

White County is on its way to passing the state's first rule for protecting a waterway from big livestock farms. It's designed to shield the Tippecanoe River Basin and its residents from pollution and farm odors.

The state is asking for a new judge in its case against IBM – the company charged with overseeing the technological overhaul of the state welfare system.

 

That's after the initial judge, David Dreyer of the Marion County Superior Court, ruled last week that the state hadn't proved IBM owed anything.

 

Dreyer was also the first judge to handle the case -- in 2012, when he ruled the company had not breached its contract to privatize and modernize Indiana's welfare system under Gov. Mitch Daniels.

slowdevil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slowdevil/3678747832/

Hoosier farmers didn't make much progress planting corn in the past week, after a strong early start -- and they're running out of time to get the state's signature crop in the ground.

Heavy spring rainfall didn't stop Indiana farmers from planting twice as much corn by the start of May as they had in 2015. They were on their way to planting a projected 2.6 percent more acres of corn than last year, despite a glut of the crop worldwide.

Wikimedia Commons

One of Northwest Indiana's biggest employers wants to ban Chinese steel from the American market.

In a complaint with the International Trade Commission, U.S. Steel says Chinese imports are hurting jobs in places like Indiana -- where steel was also a hot topic on the campaign trail.

Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

As many as a thousand union members and supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders rallied outside the Indiana Statehouse Friday in support of laid-off Carrier factory workers.

Sanders' last-minute appearance at the protest came days before Tuesday's primary election, where the Carrier story has taken center stage.

The diverse crowd on the statehouse lawn wielded signs reading "Keep it made in America" and "Save our jobs, stop corporate greed," and chanted union slogans like "stand up, fight back."

An employee rights complaint by a former Valparaiso Menards clerk led this week to a labor victory for all 45,000 of the home improvement chain's workers across the Midwest.

The issue was over mandatory arbitration, which is legal -- companies can require employees settle complaints out of court, but they have to make sure employees know what rights they're giving up.

NLRB.gov

The National Labor Relations Board has ordered an Indianapolis-based construction staffing firm to allow workers to discuss unions and compensation on the job.

Commercial Trade Source, or CTS, is one of few companies to fight this battle at the federal level. It's effectively a temp agency, providing skilled workers for construction projects nationwide.

Until now, CTS policy forbade workers from discussing wages or unionization on the job -- whether through conversation, flyers or union-branded clothing.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 Residents from about 10 central Indiana counties were in Columbus Monday to hear from experts on the impacts of large confined animal feeding operations known as CAFOs.

The talk brought out concerned residents in Bartholomew and surrounding counties.

It was organized by Indiana CAFO Watch and the Socially Responsible Agriculture Project.

Retired University of Missouri agricultural economist John Ikerd was one of the speakers.

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