NPR News

New Home Sales Decline To Five-Month Low In July

Aug 23, 2011

Two years into the economic recovery, the housing market is still showing signs of struggle. New numbers released by the Commerce Department today showed that purchases of new homes fell 0.7 percent in July and hit the lowest level in five months.

Bloomberg reports:

We have to confess we didn't know that for decades, scientists have been trying to find the "parent yeast" that makes lager beer possible.

Apparently they were.

And now, they may have an answer: Beech forests in Argentina.

"The largest earthquake to strike Colorado in almost 40 years" shook buildings but apparently caused little damage late last night, Denver's ABC 7 News reports. A few homes may have been damaged and some rock slides were reported.

It was a 5.3 magnitude temblor and the epicenter was "about 180 miles south of Denver."

Well, at least the moth was OK when it was pulled out of St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday's ear Monday night.

According to the Post Dispatch, Holliday even took the little critter home with him.

We can't vouch for its fate after that.

"The families of those who were seriously hurt when the Indiana State Fair Grandstand stage rigging collapsed" on Aug. 13, are struggling with "a mix of hoping and coping," The Indianapolis Star writes this morning.

Good morning.

The fight for control of Tripoli continues, as we reported earlier. From Libya, NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports that what had looked like it might be a quick victory for opponents of Moammar Gadhafi is turning into what could be "a bitter, difficult battle."

Libyan rebels seized control of Moammar Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound Tuesday after NATO airstrikes blasted a hole in an outer wall.

Hundreds of fighters poured inside the fortress-like complex and raised the opposition flag over Gadhafi's personal residence. The Libyan leader and his family were nowhere to be found, however.

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro, reporting from inside the compound, said the rebels were firing weapons into the air and that civilians were streaming in by the thousands to join in the celebration.

Fighting Flares In Tripoli

Aug 23, 2011

The situation in Libya remains very fluid. As NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro said on Morning Edition, there was "a stunning turn of events" on Monday.

Biologist Lou Burnett was recently in his car when his cell phone rang. It was a CNN reporter, asking about the fact that his research had been featured in a new report about wasteful government spending.

That was news to Burnett, who works at the College of Charleston in South Carolina. "I was pretty irritated," he recalls.

Meredith Perry turned 22 this month. She just graduated from college and started a new company built around a technology she recently invented.

There's plenty of bad economic news these days, but Perry and her company, called UBeam, are trying to defy it — she's hiring and entertaining funding offers from investors.

Perry's invention: a transmitter that can recharge wireless devices using ultrasonic waves. It's like Wi-Fi, she says, except instead of a wireless Internet connection, her's transmits power over the air.

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