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The Two-Way
8:44 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Baltimore Police Promise Full Investigation Into Man's Death After Arrest

Demonstrators protest the death of Freddie Gray outside Baltimore City Hall on Monday.
David Dishneau AP

Officials in Baltimore, Md., say they will thoroughly investigate the death of Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man who died after he was arrested by Baltimore Police more than a week ago.

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The Two-Way
8:27 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Norway Becoming First Country To Eliminate FM Radio

Norway is moving on from analog radios in 2017.
iStockphoto

Normay is going to eliminate FM radio in less than two years, the country's government announced, becoming the first country in the world to do so.

Norway is planning to transition completely to digital broadcasting in January 2017.

The Digital Audio Broadcasting (DAB) system offers a number of benefits over FM, said Thorhild Widvey, Norway's minister of culture, in a statement last week.

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Deceptive Cadence
7:23 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

Julia Wolfe Wins Music Pulitzer For 'Anthracite Fields'

Composer Julia Wolfe has won the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for music for Anthracite Fields, an oratorio about coal miners and their families.
Peter Serling

Julia Wolfe, a composer associated with the new-music collective Bang on a Can, has won the Pulitzer Prize for music for Anthracite Fields.

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The Two-Way
6:46 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

U.S. Navy Sends Aircraft Carrier To Coast Of Yemen

The U.S. Navy has dispatched an aircraft carrier to waters off the coast of Yemen.

As NPR's Jackie Northam reports, the vessels are joining others in the region in an increasing show of force. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The U.S. Navy says it's deploying the USS Theodore Roosevelt and the guided-missile cruiser Normandy to the Gulf of Aden to ensure the vital shipping lanes in the volatile region remain open and safe.

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All Tech Considered
6:29 pm
Mon April 20, 2015

At 50 Years Old, The Challenge To Keep Up With Moore's Law

Intel Corp. co-founder Gordon Moore holds up a silicon wafer at Intel headquarters in Santa Clara, Calif., in 2005. Moore first noted 50 years ago that the number of transistors that can be packed into a computer chip doubles about every two years. That observation, called Moore's Law, has been the basis for the entire digital revolution.
Paul Sakuma AP

Fifty years ago this week, a chemist in what is now Silicon Valley published a paper that set the groundwork for the digital revolution.

You may never have heard of Moore's law, but it has a lot do with why you will pay about the same price for your next computer, smartphone or tablet, even though it will be faster and have better screen resolution than the last one.

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