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NPR Presents
10:00 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

4/21/15: NPR Presents Michel Martin: Chartered Waters

NPR
NPR

NPR's Michel Martin is headed to New Orleans, to explore how the NOLA school system is reinventing itself, ten years after the flood.

In collaboration with WWNO, Martin brings together a dynamic group of education experts for a live on-stage dialogue that will explore the country's first all-charter school system.

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Code Switch
9:41 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

As First Black American NHL Player, Enforcer Was Defenseless Vs. Racism

Val James of the Toronto Maple Leafs takes warmup prior to a preseason game against the Boston Bruins at Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1986.
Graig Abel Collection Getty Images

The first black American hockey player in NHL history is telling his story almost 30 years after he retired.

Val James was a revered and feared fighter — known in hockey as an enforcer — during short stints for the Buffalo Sabres and the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1980s. But he was defenseless to the racist taunts and slurs that showered down on him from opposing teams' fans.

James and his wife, Ina, dropped off the map after an injury forced him out of hockey.

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It's All Politics
7:33 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

3 Reasons President Obama Is Winning This Immigration Fight

President Obama at a town hall meeting on immigration in Miami Wednesday with journalist Jose Diaz-Balart. The event was hosted by Telemundo and MSNBC.
Pedro Portal AP

As the Republican Congress tried this week to get itself out of the box it put itself in, President Obama was in Miami, aggressively ratcheting up the political pressure on the GOP on the issue underlying the standoff over funding the Department of Homeland Security — immigration. Here are three reasons why the president is winning this fight:

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National Security
7:14 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Families Of Sept. 11 Victims Watch Guantanamo Hearings With Mixed Feelings

Relatives of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks are periodically flown down to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to witness court proceedings against five men accused of plotting the attacks. For the witnesses of the most recent court session, the experience raised questions about justice, humanity and the ethics of the death penalty.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Thad Rasmussen, 36, lost his mother, Rhonda, in the Sept. 11 attacks; she died at the Pentagon. This month, he sat in a courtroom at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and looked at five men accused of planning those attacks.

"It was very difficult to see them as humans," he says.

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Cities Project
6:39 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Living Small In The City: With More Singles, Micro-Housing Gets Big

Jay Austin's tiny house in Washington, D.C., has 10-foot ceilings, a loft bed over the bathroom and a galley-style kitchen.
Franklyn Cater NPR

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:42 pm

Back in 2012, something unusual got started in an alleyway in an already tightly developed part of northeast Washington, D.C.

On an 11th-of-an-acre lot next to a cemetery, behind a block of row houses, tiny houses started to go up. And not just one little house in backyard, like you might see in many places. The builders billed this as an urban tiny house community.

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