News

Set in a dark future following a worldwide flu pandemic, a troop of actors set out to save the arts as humanity crumbles. As they travel from town to town, a power-hungry prophet twists the fate of the troop and threatens their existence. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

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Though he stopped short of calling it possible embezzlement, Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes says he’s handed over information relating to the dismissal of his former parks superintendent.

“We placed this individual on paid administrative leave, we secured the entire office, we conducted an investigation and the evidence that we found that our internal control standards and materiality threshold standards have been broken.”

The discoveries made in that investigation are now in the hands of the Clinton County Prosecutor’s office and the Indiana State Board of Accounts.

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WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Nick Palmer, Music Director of the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra, about the next performance, Opening Night, Saturday at 7:30pm in the Long Center. They discuss the program, and Maestro Palmer's recent London recording sessions!

Purdue University photo/Mark Simons

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Dr. Mo Trout, Director of Jazz Bands, about the next Purdue Jazz Band performance, Friday, October 20th at 8 pm at Loeb Playhouse in Stewart Center.

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Greg Wagoner / https://www.flickr.com/photos/minidriver/8090289596

IUPUI’s engineering department is adding an additional focus on the future of energy.

Purdue’s trustees voted last week to rename it the Department of Mechanical and Energy Engineering.

Dean David Russomanno says he wants to stay away from the politically-charged topic of the nation’s energy future, which he says he’s doing by encouraging IUPUI professors to be, in his words, “agnostic” about their research.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking about what’s going to happen when the dust clears from the coming months’ construction. Will we see a new, or just a slightly improved, Lafayette? When it comes to improving quality of life, how swiftly is the city prepared to act?

We ask Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski how the city balances cleaning up the streets while launching a string of projects this past year, meant to attract people to Lafayette. But once they’re here, how do you get them to stay?

Rob Crawley / flickr.com/photos/robcrawley/3114271990

The Indiana Public Retirement System is set to go before the U.S. Supreme Court next month, where justices will decide if it can sue a publicly-traded company for alleged securities fraud.

In June of 2011, Science Applications International Corporation – or SAIC – issued a statement to the market detailing how it was under a criminal investigation for a group of employees’ kickback scheme in New York City.

The Indiana public pension fund had bought stock in the company shortly beforehand, and claims that information should’ve been made public much earlier.

An overnight sensation when she upset Serena Williams to win Wimbledon in 2004, Maria Sharapova has experienced her fair share of highs - and lows. After serving a 15-month suspension for a drug violation, she has come back as a stronger competitor and is sharing her rags-to-riches story with her fans. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Courtesy IU Communications

Purdue University and Indiana University’s Robert H. McKinney School of Law are partnering up to form an agricultural law program. Those tasked with designing it will have to adapt to a changing field of study.

Ag lawyer Amy Cornell has been appointed as the consultant for the venture, which would train budding lawyers in agricultural issues. She’ll oversee a committee that will determine the needs of the ag market, as well as students and employers.

Cornell says ag law is broad, but holds unique opportunities because of its depth.

Barbara Brosher / IPBS

 

The Trump administration’s new rules on birth control coverage open the door for the University of Notre Dame and other employers to stop covering contraceptives as part of their health plans. A legal battle over the changes is already brewing.

University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins is applauding the policy change, saying in a statement it reinforces religious freedom.

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