News

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

 

Hundreds of people descended on Lafayette's courthouse square Monday night to remember the 49 victims killed in the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub last weekend. 

By dusk, Monday's sweltering heat had largely subsided, and as hundreds of people gathered behind Congress Street United Methodist Church, the mood was relaxed, even jovial--but that changed when pastor Clarinda Crawford took the microphone and read the names of the Orlando shooting victims aloud. 

Kauffman Foundation

A new report ranks Indianapolis last in the nation for start-up job growth.

 

The Kauffman Foundation puts out annual indices measuring entrepreneurial activity in the nation's 40 largest metropolitan areas. But this is its first report on annual growth at existing start-ups.

The 2016 report ranks Indianapolis last for jobs added at start-ups in their first five years of operation.

A Silicon Valley tech company is relocating to Carmel, in what state officials are touting as a win for Indiana's business-friendly climate.

 

San Mateo, Calif.-based Determine uses cloud technology to help companies store and manage contract data from start to finish. Its clients include AOL, Kellogg's and Sony Music Entertainment.

 

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Democratic gubernatorial candidate John Gregg Monday released a lengthy, detailed proposal he says will help spur Indiana’s economic growth.  And Gregg says it’s a plan that won’t require any new or increased taxes, relying instead on shifting existing resources.

The Gregg campaign’s 35-point plan includes proposals focused on building a skilled workforce, growing small businesses and streamlining economic development efforts. 

Gregg says those proposals, if put into action, would be judged by evaluating a series of key metrics.

Quinn Dombrowski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

A day after tens of thousands of people visited downtown Indianapolis for the annual Cadillac Barbie IN Pride Parade to celebrate the city’s LGBTQ community --- organizers Indy Pride held an interfaith vigil Sunday evening for victims of the Orlando mass shooting at a gay nightclub.

Hundreds attended the somber service, including Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Eric Weddle who brought back these sounds.

Purdue Muslim Student Association Decries Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Chris Morisse Vizza / WBAA

The Purdue Muslim Student Association released a statement about the Orlando, Florida mass shooting at a gay night club where a gunman killed at least 49 people.

The release states:

“The Purdue University Muslim Student Association offers our deepest condolences for the victims of the tragedy in Orland. Our thoughts and prayers are with the victims’ families during this difficult time.

Lafayette Mayor's Office

Much has already been written about Lafayette revamping its downtown Main Street this year – a project aimed at beautification and at luring more business to the area.

But this week on Ask The Mayor, we find out whether certain business owners are getting more bang for their buck than others are the new amenities are installed.

Also on this week's show: Amtrak officials are in Lafayette today to talk about improvements to the Hoosier State line.

WFIU / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/

Every two years the U.S. Department of Education collects civil rights data on all public schools and school districts in the United States. This week the department released those numbers from the 2013-14 school year.

The Department of Education break down by gender, race and disability access and opportunities for students at every school in country. Things like suspension, expulsion, absenteeism, juvenile justice facilities, officers in schools, restraint, seclusion, college readiness and more.

Courtesy H. Kory Cooper

Research from a Purdue anthropology professor has uncovered the first evidence of prehistoric metal trade between Asia and North America.

Anthropology professor and metallurgy expert H. Kory Cooper analyzed two objects uncovered in northern Alaska. The two tiny artifacts—a buckle and a small bead—are made of bronze. That’s important because bronze doesn’t occur in nature--it’s an alloy.

By looking at how such alloys are mixed, anthropologists can pinpoint metals age and where they’re from.

David Wilson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/davidwilson1949/12783674125

Steelmaker ArcelorMittal, whose largest North American mill is at Indiana Harbor in East Chicago, is introducing a new high-strength steel for cars.

It's part of an effort to boost profits at the world's largest steel producer by volume -- amid an uncertain time for the industry.

The new steel is designed for the interior rails and pillars that make cars safer during a crash.

A spokesperson from Arcelor says it should make cars lighter and cheaper to produce when it's rolled out next year.  

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