Eric Norris /

West Lafayette is gearing up to sue opioid manufacturers and distributors – joining a long list of U.S. cities going after painkiller producers in the courtroom.

More than a dozen manufacturers are to be named in the lawsuit, including Johnson & Johnson, Allergan and Purdue Pharma. They’re some of the companies responsible for such drugs as Norco and Oxycontin. The city will allege those companies, in its words, “deceptively marketed” opioids.

Opiate distributors will also be named in the lawsuit, alleging those parties failed to report and stop high-quantity orders.

City of West Lafayette

West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis – who had seemed ready to step away from the mayor’s office after this term, now says he’s leaning toward running again in next year’s election.

However, he might differ on a major topic of conversation from from one of his key allies, who’s running for election this year.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, Mayor Dennis talks about the need to better regulate guns – a topic current police chief and sheriff candidate Jason Dombkowski has spoken somewhat differently about.

Sunday Alcohol Sales Signed Into Law

Mar 1, 2018
Samantha Horton / IPB News

In front of media, staffers and legislators, Gov. Eric Holcomb signed the bill into law. Holcomb says the bill is giving the consumers what they want.

“This is just yet another example where the State of Indiana has sought to, and indeed modernized, our laws to meet consumer expectation,” Holcomb says.

As expected, Hoosiers will be able to purchase alcohol on Sundays, starting this weekend.

“There is absolutely no need to any longer to make run for the border if you’re a Hoosier or a Hoosier at heart,” Holcomb says.

Jeanie Lindsay / IPB News

Another possible change to education law in Indiana addresses a unique need for some students with disabilities; one piece of a bill moving through the general assembly would allow private school students to attend the Indiana School for the Deaf.

Students with disabilities in non-pubic schools have something called Individualized Service Plans, or ISPs, and public school students with disabilities have something similar, called Individualized Education Plans, or IEPs. The Indiana School for the Deaf only accepts IEPs.

Jill Sheridan / IPB News

A multi-state study to examine early on-set Alzheimer’s will launch soon, and it’s based at Indiana University’s School of Medicine. The Longitudinal Early Onset Alzheimer’s Disease or LEADS, is the first, large scale clinical trial to research the disease.

Dr. Liana Apostolova was joined by co-researchers in Indianapolis this week as the study gets underway. The National Institutes of Health awarded the group $7.6 million to research early onset Alzheimer’s.

David Shankbone / Wikimedia Commons

A Senate panel voted Wednesday to get rid of proposed alcohol regulations that would have governed where alcohol is housed in stores and who’s legally allowed to ring it up.

Some advocates decry the elimination of what they call safeguards the same day the governor signed a bill expanding alcohol sales to Sundays.

The proposed bill would have required all cashiers conducting alcohol sales to be at least 21-years-old. But a Senate committee stripped out that provision.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Health care providers across the state will be subject to new reporting requirements when it comes to complications from abortions.

That’s under legislation approved by the House Wednesday.

The bill creates a long list of potential abortion complications physicians, hospitals, and clinics must report to the state. It includes everything from blood clots and cardiac arrest to anxiety and sleeping disorders.

The Purdue Symphony and Philharmonic Orchestras take the stage at the Long Center this Friday evening at 8pm. WBAA's John Clare spoke to director Adam Bodony about the concert.

Tex Texin /

In March, the Frankfort Police Department will begin to treat every drug overdose as a crime scene in an effort to find and convict drug dealers.

According to new overdose guidelines, officers will first respond to the overdose in a medical sense. And if an opioid was involved, they’ll administer the overdose-reversal drug naloxone.

Then, officers will collect evidence and statements from the scene to help build criminal cases against drug dealers.

Deputy Chief Scott Shoemaker says he’s confident most victims won’t cooperate, so police will dig deeper.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

One of the big themes this year at Purdue University is tracking. The school plans to better track how efficient its business process are. However, implementation of a new human capital management system has already incurred at least a half-year’s worth of delays.

Employees are being asked to track their health more closely, and are being incentivized to exercise by being offered small discounts on health insurance. But how is the school tracking whether people actually go to the gym?