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U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

 Residents from about 10 central Indiana counties were in Columbus Monday to hear from experts on the impacts of large confined animal feeding operations known as CAFOs.

The talk brought out concerned residents in Bartholomew and surrounding counties.

It was organized by Indiana CAFO Watch and the Socially Responsible Agriculture Project.

Retired University of Missouri agricultural economist John Ikerd was one of the speakers.

purdue
courtesy Purdue University

11:15 p.m. Monday UPDATE:

An e-mail from the Bernie Sanders campaign confirms a 12 p.m. event Wednesday at Purdue's France Cordova Recreational Sports Center.

Doors will open to the event at 9:00 a.m., with the senator's speech slated to start at noon.

A press release from the campaign says Sanders plans to address college affordability, among other topics.

Nadya Peek / https://www.flickr.com/photos/nadya/2977614168

Indiana’s high absentee voter turnout may signal a large primary turnout on May 3. Indiana voters have submitted around 119,000 absentee requests so far -- that's about as many total absentee ballots were cast four years ago.

Indiana Election Division co-director Angie Nussmeyer says 2008 set the standard for Indiana turnout. She says around 185,000 Hoosiers voted absentee in the 2008 primary.

Nussmeyer says this election’s bounce-back may stem from heightened political interest and increasing absentee ballot awareness.

Gage Skidmore / https://www.flickr.com/photos/gageskidmore/8571618966

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) says he’s entirely focused on Indiana and what he calls his “head-to-head contest” with Donald Trump. Cruz spent Monday traveling across the Hoosier State after he and Gov. John Kasich (R-OH) announced a coordinated plan to prevent Trump from getting the GOP nomination.

Cruz spent Monday throughout southern and central Indiana, his third consecutive day in the state.  That comes as he shifts his resources to the Hoosier State and away from primaries in Oregon and New Mexico. 

Tom Blackwell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tjblackwell/5659432136

New federal rules making more white-collar workers eligible for overtime pay could be finalized in the next few weeks -- but the state doesn't know exactly how many workers stand to benefit.

Right now, most workers can't earn overtime if they make more than about $24,000 a year. That threshold is slated to more than double this summer, meaning if an employee makes less than $50,400, they'll be paid for working beyond 40 hours a week.

It sounds like good news for workers -- but state Chamber of Commerce CEO Kevin Brinegar isn't so sure.

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