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Steve Baker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebiglens/18597931390

Plans for the first service of the First Church of Cannabis could go up in smoke if anyone partakes of the namesake drug. Marijuana legalization activist Bill Levin  started his church on the day Governor Mike Pence signed the Religious Freedom Restoration Act into law, and says he plans to hold the church’s first service on July 1.

"I'll give a short sermon, I mean real short, and do church announcements the way you’re supposed to do," Levin says. "Then we’ll all rise, read the deity dozen, and at the end of the deity dozen we will celebrate life and light up."

Rachel Morello / StateImpact Indiana

As baby boomers retire, they’re creating a gap in the workforce…and the education field is no exception.

Principals, assistant principals and superintendents are leaving their positions…but instead of waiting for those positions to open up and going through the routing hiring process, some school districts are trying to get a head start by training teachers from the bottom up.

Rich Renomeron / https://www.flickr.com/photos/rrenomeron/8597018772/

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of marriage equality Friday morning. Same-sex couples already had the right to marry in Indiana, but now those marriages will now be recognized in all 50 states.

Despite the good news, Pride Lafayette Vice President Nicki Anderson says Indiana can still enact more protections for its LGBT citizens.

"People can still get fired from their jobs, kicked out of apartments, kicked out of their housing because they’re gay," Anderson says.

Sterling Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/n0ssc/

Local amateur radio operators will join with their counterparts from around the country this weekend for the annual "Field Day."

Joe March, Indiana spokesman for American Radio Relay League, says local amateur radio operators will participate in the 24-hour test of their emergency communication systems. 

Goodreads.com

Sixteen-year-old Sarah Kelley just wants to dance with her friends underneath the moonlight, but what she finds in the dark of night is sinister and strange. Hoosier author Aaron Galvin constructs a chilling tale of the aftermath of the Salem witch trials in his historical thriller, Salem's Vengeance. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review of the first book in Galvin's Salem Trilogy.

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