News

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

The Lafayette City Council Monday approved the first reading of a new ordinance aimed at preserving the city’s remaining brick streets.

The ordinance would require the city to re-pave and restore brick streets with brick, rather than concrete or asphalt.

Only nine stretches of brick street remain in Lafayette, mostly clustered around downtown and in the city’s Southwestern Highland Park neighborhood.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

The first new school construction in the West Lafayette School Corporation in more than 50 years began in earnest Monday—an intermediate school at the site of the Burtsfield Gym that will house students from the current Happy Hollow Elementary School.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA Radio

Tippecanoe County is enlisting help from man’s best friend to make court appearances less stressful for abused and neglected children.

Court Appointed Special Advocate Executive Director Coleen Connor says local members of Therapy Dogs International contacted her at the same time she and some volunteer advocates were investigating the idea of bringing a trained therapy dog into the courtroom to calm some of the most-traumatized child victims.

Steve Burns/Indiana Public Broadcasting

The small town of Austin, Indiana, made national headlines for an HIV outbreak tied to injection drug use two years ago.

Now, community in Scott County is making news for a different reason.

For the first time ever, the high school’s Dimensions show choir is heading to a national competition in Chicago later this month.

HOT CON / Purdue LGBTQ Center

The Purdue Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Center hopes its weekend conference will bridge any gaps between the LGBTQ community and the campus at-large.

Center director Lowell Kane says he hopes Purdue’s administration recognizes the prominence of the LGBTQ community on campus.

And Ricardo Quintana Vallejo, the Ph.D. student who organized the conference, says having the sessions in West Lafayette sends a geographic message.

Wellness Program For Employees Has Lasting Impact

Mar 31, 2017
Leigh DeNoon/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Stress is an occupational hazard for healthcare workers.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Leigh DeNoon reports on how the wellness training of an entire department in one Indianapolis hospital has had a lasting impact.

Like many Americans, Fernow McClure found himself overweight and unhappy with his life -- until he got his mind opened to mindfulness.

“That’s certainly changed my life,” he says.

Occupational stress can be a killer for hospital workers like McClure.

Purdue University/ Mark Simons

Black Voices of Inspiration perform their Spring Concert this Sunday afternoon at 3pm in Loeb Playhouse in Stewart Center. The concert features various genres and musical styles of African American composers and arrangers. WBAA's John Clare spoke with director James Dekle about the performance.

British author Ali Smith has released a collection of short stories that explore the power of words and the books that contain them. Fictional characters delve into the meaning of libraries and language in their own personal ways, tying together the importance of preserving places of learning. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

The first phase of the reconstruction of State Street is due to begin Monday, and that’ll mean changes for bus riders in West Lafayette. CityBus employees and riders alike are trying to see the closure of one of the city’s busiest streets as a blessing in disguise.

CityBus officials have planned detours for the company’s routes that use State Street. Development Manager Bryce Gibson says he hopes the detours are an opportunity for people who hadn’t previously been using public transportation to start.

deepfruit / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slippek/

Indiana senators are looking to add more restrictions and regulations to county syringe exchange programs, or SEPs.

Four amendments have been added a bill granting counties the ability to set up their own syringe services programs. Currently, the state health commissioner must certify a public health emergency before such a program can be created.

Pages