News

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Democrat Baron Hill turned the campaign for Indiana’s open U.S. Senate seat on its head Monday when he dropped out -- leaving a path for former Senator Evan Bayh to join the race.

Hill had been trailing Rep. Todd Young (R-9th) in both polls and fundraising. In withdrawing, the Democrat says his party needs a candidate with money and name recognition.

Evan Bayh isn’t confirming that he is that candidate, but political analyst Ed Feigenbaum says he’d have a big advantage.

Hundreds Join Indy Black Lives Matter Protest

Jul 11, 2016
Michelle Johnson

Organizers of a Black Lives Matter protest on Saturday in Indianapolis called on white allies to stand with them in the fight for justice and police reforms.

The protest at the Statehouse was one of dozens around the nation after a week that included police killings of black men in Minnesota and Louisiana, and a sniper attack that killed five white officers at a Black Lives Matter march in Dallas, Texas.

Since it began three years ago, after the death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin three years ago, white people have joined the movement in increasing numbers.

Sarah Altendorf / https://www.flickr.com/photos/sarah_elizabeth_simpson/

Indiana ranks 12th in the nation for the number of wind turbines, and wind energy production is projected to grow.

But Clinton County -- which had one of the state’s first wind ordinances – is now embroiled in talks about whether there will ever be any turbines there.

The Clinton County Area Planning Commission is collecting public comments from residents—for example, how much noise people are willing to tolerate—before they update its wind farm zoning ordinances.

Joe Brunner / YouTube

Global trade's impact on Indiana jobs has made headlines this election season -- and so far this year, high numbers of Hoosier workers have also qualified for federal benefits due to trade-related layoffs.

 

Estimates from the Department of Workforce Development show that, in the last six months, more Indiana workers have qualified for federal benefits due to trade-related layoffs than in any of the past five years -- more than 3,200 since Jan. 1.

 

City of West Lafayette

You might say this week’s Ask The Mayor is all about cameras.

They’re watching us as we drive, and we talk on this week's show about how the city of West Lafayette is trying to use them to streamline traffic.

They’re also on us when police pull us over while driving – and the cost of getting copies of that video may be going up sharply.

Also on today’s show, as construction has gotten going on the periphery of the State Street overhaul, we ask about a couple other ancillary issues.

  Over time, the greats of past generations can be forgotten without a trace. John T. McCutcheon, a Lafayette native and highly successful cartoonist, seems to be one of those whose contributions during the Great Depression are largely lost. Author Tony Garel-Frantzen hopes to bring his legacy back, documenting his small-town upbringings and his path to prestige in the big city of Chicago. With diary pieces by McCutcheon and original material from the author, the journey to fame is presented for new audiences to appreciate the history of Indiana's own.

Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky / Facebook

Indiana currently has six clinics, in four counties, providing elective abortions. That means only about four percent of counties have abortion providers—less than the average of 11 percent nationwide. But despite recent victories for the pro-choice movement, that’s unlikely to change.

LIFT

Today's manufacturers are using lighter materials -- and less of them -- to make products cheaper and more efficient. That's transforming many Indiana manufacturing jobs.

Now, the Indiana Manufacturers Association, or IMA, is teaming up with a federal group to train more workers in what's known as lightweighting.

Lafayette Police Department

At the end of 2015 and the beginning of 2016, Lafayette leaders announced several initiatives aimed at stemming the drug use that fuels a significant portion of the major crimes committed in the city.

Through six months of the year, crime is down about three percent from the first half of 2015, though still well above levels from 2010 and 2011.

Mister G.C.

Brenda Crawford lives in Indianapolis. She began having trouble with her primary care doctor when she started getting older.

"There’s so many times that you try to explain what’s going on,” she says, “and if it’s something they haven’t experienced or had in another patient, they just don’t know and they don’t understand.”

She said she believes her doctors cared about her, but couldn’t keep up with her multiple conditions as well as with the complicated medical insurance procedures elderly people bring into the clinic along with their illnesses.

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