News

Purdue University

Purdue University and its police department are investigating the allegations of misconduct that shut down its summer camp/research study called “Camp DASH.”

University officials believe most of the allegations – among those, sexual offenses and battery – can be linked to one female participant.

Vice Provost for Student Life Beth McCuskey says this is the first such report at any of Purdue’s multiple camps.

She says it’s unclear how this may affect those camps’ reputation.

courtesy Andy Whelton

About a year ago, Purdue engineering professor Andy Whelton started a Kickstarter campaign to fund his research on what's known as cured in place pipe, or CIPP, in part because he’d had to use some of his own cash to keep it going.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The city of Crawfordsville completed its final budget workshop Monday night, and despite a 10-percent health insurance premium increase, the mayor says it could have been much worse.

During the meeting, Crawfordsville mayor Todd Barton said at the county level, premiums are going up 20-percent. The city’s employees are also receiving a two-percent salary increase.

The majority of the city’s departments have little to no significant change in their budget for next year, which Barton says is due to planning.

J J / flickr.com/photos/tattoodjay/4172577749

The Lafayette Police Department is asking residents to bring unwanted drugs and needles to them, instead of flushing them down the toilet or giving them away.

The LPD is hosting a ‘drug takeback’ event this weekend in an effort to keep substances like unused opioids off the streets and out of the water – but it’s not primarily addressed at the types of drugs Lafayette is having the most trouble policing, such as heroin.

Sgt. Matt Gard says even if a person brings illicit drugs or a prescription that isn’t theirs, they should feel safe to let the police dispose of it.

Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission

A Lafayette subdivision comprised of Habitat for Humanity homes is one step closer to breaking ground on the city’s southwest side.

The Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission approved a plan for up to seven additional homes at its last meeting – despite a few nearby residents speaking out against it. 

In 2004, utilities were routed to the area to accommodate houses. Assistant City Engineer Bob Foley says that was in preparation for redevelopment.

Though the Ilyiad is well-known, this week's feature delves deeper into the timeless tale. Highlighting the devastating consequences of war in eloquence, author Caroline Alexander combines the meticulous accuracy of a historian with the fluid narrative of a writer. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Core Spaces & The City of West Lafayette

One big project in the State Street development plan is a city council vote away from being shrunk.

The Hub – a mixed residential and commercial building – is being scaled back from 15 to 11 stories. The property developer, Core Spaces, petitioned the Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission this week for the latter.

Core Spaces Chief Development Officer Eric Grimm says the decision came from market research.

City of Frankfort

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking about expansion. The Indiana Department of Transportation has released its Next Level Roads Plan, hoping to draw in international industry and Clinton County has welcomed two businesses into a key intersection. But, where will a city like Frankfort go – or grow – now, with others crowding the road?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

If construction crews now tearing up sidewalks along West Lafayette’s State Street hope to have the road open on campus within a month, there can’t be many more significant rainstorms.

That’s the word from the Joint Board of Purdue and West Lafayette employees overseeing the project.

West Lafayette Development Director Erik Carlson sits on the Board and says further severe weather could make it a challenge for the road to reopen in time for Purdue students to return to campus in mid-August.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

The Indiana Law Enforcement Academy will begin to bill police departments $500 per student this fall.

Participation in the Academy’s 15-week basic training course is required for prospective cops, and used to be free before a change in Indiana code took effect July 1.

Academy Executive Director Rusty Goodpaster says that’s just a slice of the actual cost.

“The last time we did a study – I believe it was 2013 that we went through it – and it’s roughly about $8,500 that it costs to train a student,” he says.

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