News

Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

Last week’s heavy rainfall has added more delays to Indiana’s corn harvest.

As of this week, 70-percent of the state’s corn has been harvested – that’s compared to 85-percent at this time last year. That’s even though, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wet conditions have forced farmers to focus on corn instead of completing soybean harvests.

Brian McConkey

Purdue Theater features “The Sins of Sor Juana,” written by Karen Zacarias and directed by Kristine Holtvedt. The play is about the imagined life of the 17th century writer, poet, scholar and nun Juana Inés de la Cruz. WBAA's John Clare spoke to Holtvedt about the production.

Quinn Dombrowski / https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/

The West Lafayette City Council approved plans Monday to set physical and operational boundaries for new businesses along the Wabash River.

The so-called “riverfront” district now expands past River Road, up State Street and along Fowler Avenue. The council voted to support applications for liquor licenses in the district so long as the business' sales are at least 67-percent food (i.e. not more than one-third alcohol) or it stays open no longer than from 11 a.m. to midnight.

courtesy Jordan University of Science and Technology

Purdue disease researchers have partnered with a university in the Middle Eastern nation of Jordan on a project searching for infectious disease treatments.

The pact allows easier sharing of faculty between Purdue and the Jordan University of Science and Technology, or JUST.

Falah Shidaifat is the dean of JUST’s veterinary program and says the focus is on more than treating disease in either Indiana or Jordan.

lafayettechildrenschoir.org

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with the Lafayette Children's Choir's Director Leeann Starkey about the next LCC concert, Patchwork for Peace, Sunday afternoon at 4 at the Immanuel United Church of Christ.

Years after losing her sister to an eight-year bout with cancer, Molly decided that a deeper dive into her family's healing process was necessary. Her mother, a clinical psychologist from the Lafayette area, pieced together diary entries, interviews, and reflection pieces into a beautifully written memoir of the journey of their grief. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

When white supremacist literature began appearing on Purdue University’s campus, President Mitch Daniels said he didn’t want to spend time giving the promoters any more notice than they deserved.

But by one account, there have now been more than half-a-dozen incidents of hate speech or threatening actions on campus, and the campus community is putting increasing pressure on the president to take a side, rather than falling back on the school’s broad free speech policy.

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor with West Lafayette’s John Dennis, we talk about things getting thrown away.

A listener wants to know how recycling in the city really works – can he be sure his plastic bottles are going to a landfill?

Also, there’s new data about the county’s syringe exchange program, which Mayor Dennis is against, along with his police chief and their counterparts across the river. About half the needles given out so far haven’t come back. So where are they ending up?

Jim Hammer / www.flickr.com/photos/hammer51012/14509768764

The Lafayette City Council is one step closer to approving a nearly 50-percent water rate increase, but officials say it’ll only make a few dollars’ difference on an average resident’s monthly bill.

After conducting a rate study, the city is moving forward with what officials are calling the Water System Capital Improvements Plan -- which argues the current water charges aren’t enough to cover costs of running and maintaining Lafayette’s wastewater utility.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

With just one hurdle left to clear before Purdue University’s deal to buy for-profit Kaplan University is complete, several hundred faculty members are hoping to put up a roadblock.

More than 300 of them signed a petition that was sent this week to the Higher Learning Commission, whose accreditors must sign off on the deal before it can proceed.

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