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Purdue University Latino Cultural Center / Facebook

The space now occupied by the Purdue Latino Cultural Center is slated to become a fraternity parking lot.

Purdue Research Foundation officials say Purdue’s Phi Gamma Delta chapter purchased the land the LCC occupies and plans to expand into the lot.

The LCC will be forced to relocate to a smaller house a couple blocks closer to campus academic buildings early next semester.

Marc Magliari, Amtrak

Amtrak ramped up its services Wednesday when it resumed complete control of all facets of the Hoosier State train that runs eight times a week between Indianapolis and Chicago.

The arrival of Amtrak’s high profile dome car, food service, business class and free Wi-Fi signal local, state and federal leaders are focused on maintaining revenue gains achieved after the state hired a private contractor to market and improve the money-losing service.

EmmetCahill.com

Emmet Cahill, award-winning Irish tenor and a principal singer with Celtic Thunder, will perform at Studio 37 in Fishers on Saturday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m. WBAA's John Clare spoke with Emmet about the performance.

Brad Trent

Judy Collins has "inspired audiences with sublime vocals, boldly vulnerable songwriting, personal life triumphs, and a firm commitment to social activism." Since the 1960s, she has evoked "idealism and steely determination of a generation united against social and environmental injustices." Five decades later, her presence shines as new generations bask "in her iconic 50-album body of work, and heed inspiration from her spiritual discipline to thrive in the music industry for half a century."

Shutter Sweet Photography

The African Children's Choir is a nonprofit humanitarian and relief organization "dedicated to helping Africa's most vulnerable children today so they can help Africa tomorrow." WBAA's John Clare spoke with tour leader Kyle Serquinia about their performance coming up Friday, March 3rd in Logansport, IN.

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Looking Down, Looking Out, and Looking Up: Maps and the Human Experience is the latest exhibit at the Virginia Kelly Karnes Archives and Special Collections Research Center at Purdue University.  WBAA's John Clare spoke to Outreach Archivist Adriana Harmeyer about the center and their latest exhibit that includes artifacts of Amelia Earhart, Gene Cernan, and Lillian Gilbreth.

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

A bill moving from the state House to Senate this week would expand the number of vaccinations Indiana’s pharmacists may give to patients. It’s the latest evidence of the profession’s growing role in the healthcare industry, but the possibility the question: Are patients sacrificing quality for convenience?

Pharmacies used to simply be a place where you could pick up your pills — and maybe a cane or a page of stamps. But these days, pharmacy services are expanding.

Alex Wild / http://www.myrmecos.neT

New research from Indiana University scientists shines a light on what makes certain insects male or female. The study, published Monday in the journal Nature Communications, examined what happened when researchers suppressed the so-called “doublesex” master gene, which assigns traits to different sexes of the same species.

Sparktography / https://www.flickr.com/people/sparktography/

While West Lafayette and Purdue University are focused on rebuilding State Street, one resident is asking city leaders to look at that project’s impact on another major road – Northwestern Avenue.

Jim Klatch says the new perimeter parkway designed to carry traffic around the heart of campus will increase traffic on Northwestern, particularly on the north end of Purdue’s campus, between Stadium Avenue and Cherry Lane.

Elad Rahmin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/eladrahmin/

Deaths from drug overdoses have continued to increase in Indiana, mirroring national trends reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention last week.

According to the CDC report, the national drug-related death rate has increased more than two and a half times since 1999.

In that same time period, state health department numbers show the number of drug overdose deaths in Indiana has gone up 570 percent. In 2015, 1,236 people died from drug-related OD's.

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