News

City of Frankfort

We’ve talked a lot with Frankfort’s Chris McBarnes about road repaving here on Ask The Mayor.

Usually, it’s a question about why SR28 is in such bad shape.

But this week, a more positive tone – when the city’s bids come in lower than expected, more paving can be done, But how much more?

Also on this week’s program, some talk about public safety. The city has had a hard time gaining accreditation from a group of police chiefs, in part because of poor evidence handling. We’ll ask what’s held that up for three years.

www.flickr.com/photos/giomio/4318389521

A food desert is a neighborhood with low, or no access to fresh fruits and vegetables, or dairy and meats.

It is a growing national problem, and in Indiana 59 percent of counties have food deserts.

Some state lawmakers have proposed legislation to fight the problem.

But Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan found much of the work remains with non-profits and community organizations.

It’s after school at IPS 58, a grade school in Indianapolis.

John Clare

Michael Gilbertson is a composer in Iowa, and Tracy Jacobson is a bassoonist in Texas. They are both in West Lafayette to be featured this weekend with the Lafayette Symphony Orchestra. Michael and Tracy spoke to WBAA's Music Director John Clare about a variety of topics - from new work The Cosmos by Gilbertson for Jacobson's theatrical WindSync, to the importance of public radio.

http://www.wvys.org/

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with the Wabash Valley Youth Symphony's Artistic Director José Valencia and two members of the orchestra performing in the next WVYS concert, Sunday evening at 7 at the Long Center for the Performing Arts.

There's more about the concert here

  Translated from it's original text by Howard Goldblatt, Apricot's Revenge follows the case of a rich Chinese businessman, suspiciously found dead during a casual afternoon swim. Along with twists and turns that take the reader from suspect to suspect, the beautifully translated language is as gripping as the plot. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

 

    

JD Gray/WTIU

North Central Indiana is hoping new state funds and collaborations will help attract workers and diversify local economies.

That's especially challenging in Elkhart, known as the recreational vehicle capital of the world -- and the city with the nation's highest unemployment rate during the recession.

Now, the RV industry is booming -- but that's created problems of its own.

Christian Schnettelker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/manoftaste-de/

Citizen advocacy groups want the Indiana Supreme Court to reconsider its ruling in a case involving the House Republican caucus and the state’s public records law.

The groups filed a lawsuit last years to gain access to emails between a House Republican lawmaker and utility companies.

Nicolas Huk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/128359034@N07/

Indiana’s largest cities and towns—especially around Indianapolis—continue to see a surge in population. A new study of 2015 census data from the Indiana Business Research Center at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business say Indy-area communities dominate a list of the state’s fastest-growing places.

Matt Kinghorn, demographer at the IBRC, says that’s nothing new.

David Cornwell / https://www.flickr.com/photos/dave_cornwell/14959884063

On Wednesday, the Environmental Protection Agency proposed to increase the amount of biofuel in gasoline, a metric known as the Renewable Fuel Standard. That means more ethanol produced in the state will find its way into people’s cars.

The increase is good news for Indiana’s farmers. Kyle Cline is the National Policy Advisor at the Indiana Farm Bureau.

“Indiana’s a leading state in ethanol production,” he says, “and [the RFS] has been very important for our farmers’ bottom line and business.”

Thibaud Saintin / https://www.flickr.com/photos/thibaud_saintin/

Federal, state and local law enforcement are increasing public awareness and enforcement efforts surrounding human trafficking as Indiana prepares for the Indianapolis 500. 

Officials say Indiana is a “hub” for human sex trafficking because of the large sporting events it often hosts.

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