News

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

The West Lafayette City Council is set to vote Monday on the Parks and Recreation Department’s action plan, which includes spending more than $1.8 million on the Morton Community Center – a building that’s been the de facto city hall for the last three years.

Joe Hren / IPBS

A 75 degree, partly sunny day with a car window cracked open could still cause a pet locked inside to suffer heat stroke.

That’s why a state law that takes effect July 1st allows a passerby to break into a hot car to rescue the pet and not be charged with a crime. The law does say the person breaking the window still has to pay for half the cost of vehicle repairs.

Monroe County Humane Association Executive Director Rebecca Warren says she thinks the new law is a good step forward.

Renowned author Michael Chabon explores the life of his terminally-ill grandfather in this week's feature. Through his adventurous tales, ranging from love and marriage to space shuttles, Chabon's grandfather toes the line between extraordinary and fantasy. Leaving readers wondering what is real and what is not, Moonglow paints a deathbed confession in a whimsical light. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

cycleluxembourg / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cycleluxembourg/

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night is expected to conduct a second reading of an ordinance creating an advisory committee which would be charged with making the city’s streets safer for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The City of Lafayette has begun evicting some residents from low-income housing just south of the city’s downtown.

That’s because those homes are slated to be razed and replaced with new townhomes.

It’s all part of Mayor Tony Roswarski’s strategy to increase population density near downtown – an area that still doesn’t have a grocery store.

But could such a move be made to help the city’s dilapidated north end, which is home to run-down houses and Lafayette’s highest crime rate?

ADAPT Pharma / narcan.com

The overdose reversal drug naloxone is in high demand across Indiana. But the state is now seeing more mixes of opioids causing overdoses. That’s leading first responders to go through their supplies more quickly.

Overdoses caused by multiple types of opioids require larger or repeated doses of naloxone.

Justin Phillips founded the group Overdose Lifeline and says first responders may have to administer as many as a dozen doses of naloxone to combat one overdose caused by a mix of drugs.

courtesy Purdue University

Purdue researchers are partnering with Microsoft and scientists at three other universities around the globe to determine whether they’ve found a way to create a stable form of what’s known as “quantum computing.”

A new five-year agreement aims to build a type of system that could perform computations that are currently impossible in a short timespan, even for supercomputers.

https://www.facebook.com/LafayetteBallet/

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Sandra Peticolas, Director of the Lafayette Ballet Company,  about their next performances, Balances, Friday and Saturday, June 2nd and 3rd at 7:30pm at the Lafayette Ballet Ballroom in Lafayette.

Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

Mike Mozart / flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14319904578

A Purdue agricultural economist is projecting gasoline prices will remain low this summer.

Wally Tyner says there’s usually a bump in price for the summer months, but an industry surplus has kept crude oil around $50 a barrel.

“What that did is it gave the U.S. shale oil producers enough profit margin to increase their production,” he says. “Their costs have fallen 30-percent in the last three years.”

Tyner says the increase in shale oil production – now up to 600,000 barrels a day – should balance out OPEC’s 1.2 million barrel cut by the end of the year.

Pages