News

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Kids are returning to school this month, and according to the National Summer Learning Association, about nine out of ten teachers will spend as much as three weeks on review because of summer learning loss. That’s something school districts and libraries continually try to fight with academic programs.

lovingheartanimalshelter.org

John Clare talks to Kati Davis of the Loving Heart Animal Shelter, a no-kill animal shelter and adoption organization. Activities coming up this month include the BOW WOW Film Fest on Sunday, August 6th, and the 2nd Annual Sizzlin' Summer Fest on Saturday, August 19th.

Scott Meyers / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/photos/89022304

The Tippecanoe County Area Plan Commission appears poised to approve new rules governing where self-storage facilities may be built and what happens inside of them.

The APC will consider a proposal at a meeting this week which would bar such facilities from being built on land currently zoned for agricultural use.

County Commissioner Tom Murtaugh helped spearhead the ordinance and says it comes out of a permit denial for land next to a creek on the far eastern edge of Lafayette.

Wildlife in Need

The animal rights advocacy organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals is threatening to sue a southern Indiana wildlife center.

PETA says it will sue Wildlife in Need, located near Louisville in Charlestown, Indiana, and its owner Timothy Stark unless the organization agrees to move its big cats to other sanctuaries.

Wes Jackson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/boilermakerwes/3608649743/

Purdue University officials are declining comment about the school’s pending investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct at an on-campus summer camp.

The school sent out a press release Friday saying the university’s vice president for ethics and compliance, Alysa Rollock, would lead the inquiry.

But staff at Rollock’s office said she was unavailable for an interview Friday and a Purdue spokesperson said the school preferred to let the press release stand as the University’s only comment on the matter.

Annie Ropeik/IPB News

 

One year ago, East Chicago Mayor Anthony Copeland told residents of the West Calumet Housing Complex they had to move out because of lead and arsenic contamination.

The announcement sparked a year of frantic action from residents, public officials, activists, and lawyers that's still ongoing.

In Blood, Lead & Soil: A Year In East Chicagoa special hour of coverage from Indiana Public Broadcasting, our reporters look at the past year of the crisis and take stock of what's ahead.

This week's feature takes readers through the canals of Venice, traveling from past to present and back again. A hunchback man finds himself in the city after being sent on a mysterious quest from a woman he believes he loves, all the while envisioning how various people from the distant past experienced those same streets. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

wp paarz / www.flickr.com/photos/141290938@N03/26682691294

The Montgomery County Sheriff’s Department is facing a lawsuit in federal court after an allegation that the department illegally issued a no-contact order.

Douglas Sarver claims after his arrest for driving under the influence, the department presented a no-contact order -- meaning he could not speak with his minor son.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton is focusing a lot these days on fostering cooperation.

He’s hosted the first of what he hopes will be a series of meetings with business leaders, he’s brought together multiple parties to complete a long-stalled road project and he’s working with the state on Stellar Communities projects.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

A recent study shows Republicans -- the group that elected Purdue University President Mitch Daniels to two terms as governor -- have a souring view of whether higher education is worth it anymore.

So on this edition of WBAA's Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels, we ask him why conservatives might see college as less of a good influence, even as Democrats see it as more and more worthwhile.

Pages