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Sony Classical

Joshua Bell is a classical superstar. With more than 30 years as a soloist, chamber musician, recording artist, and conductor, Bell has recorded more than 40 albums winning Grammy, Mercury, and Gramophone awards! Josh is currently the Music Director of the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, only the 2nd person to hold this post since 1958, and he is a Senior Lecturer for violin and chamber music at Indiana University.

WFIU/WTIU News file photo

 

More Indiana high school students than ever are earning college credit.

More than 60 percent of 2016 graduates received advanced placement or dual credits, according to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s latest college readiness report. That’s up from 47 percent just four years ago.

Sean Tierney is an associate commissioner for policy and research with the Commission. He says this means high schoolers are better prepared for college.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Bells chimed from the Montgomery County Courthouse clock tower Sunday for the first time since World War II. County officials held a dedication ceremony for the tower, hailing it as the focal point of the community.

Residents – who haven’t seen a tower atop the courthouse in more than 70 years – braved scorching heat and lined the streets of Crawfordsville to see its dedication.

The first tower was taken down in the 1940s after a painter discovered it was leaning toward the street. Its bell was melted down to make ammunition for the war effort.

Barbara Brosher / WFIU/WTIU News

 

 

After decades of waiting, Hoosiers put up for adoption during the state’s closed adoptions era could soon learn more about their birth families. A bill passed two years ago means that starting in July, most adoption records from 1941 to 1993 will be open.

Many adoptees are hoping it will provide clarity to their lifelong questions. Ryan Griffith has a lot as he flips through pages of his baby book.

Jieun Baek reveals the inner workings of North Korea’s Information Underground, a courageous group of people risking their lives to bring the isolated country all of the films, television shows, soap operas, books, and encyclopedias that its own militaristic regime has banned. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Courtesy Purdue University

A patient’s self-evaluation of mental health problems may be more accurate than previously thought according to new research out of Purdue University. 

Past studies indicate patient and therapist diagnoses of personality disorders do not align.  But this new study found different results when patients and providers had the same diagnostic tool.

Lead author and Purdue professor Doug Samuels says patients and providers identified many of the same symptoms at the similar places on a personality assessment scale.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

After Lafayette lost a prominent sports event and cancelled two summer festivals, the city’s left to fill those gaps in the calendar.

The Taste of Tippecanoe is just days away, and it’s always a big draw for the city – but there may be a wave of Lafayette-branded events on the horizon for the city’s redeveloped hot spots.

Steve Burns / WTIU/WFIU News

 

Jaylen Man is a junior at Indiana University. He’s your average college student, except for one thing: he doesn’t have a driver’s license.

“I do have a learners permit, but that’s only because I needed a form of ID for my twenty-first birthday,” Man says.

Man prefers walking. He says, unlike his friends, he just never took an interest in driving. And he still gets picked on for it.

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re digging into West Lafayette’s growing pains. One of the city's roundabout projects just won an award, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t complaints. And, the city is gearing up for several more development projects both downtown and near the local airport. So how does a city maintain – or shape a new – identity when so much of the past has to be torn down?

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

Lafayette’s Food Finders Food Bank is partnering with CityBus this summer to deliver fresh produce to ten sites throughout the city. The initiative supplements the food supplies low-income families need during a tough time of year: the summer break from school.

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