News

Courtesy IU Communications

Purdue University and Indiana University’s Robert H. McKinney School of Law are partnering up to form an agricultural law program. Those tasked with designing it will have to adapt to a changing field of study.

Ag lawyer Amy Cornell has been appointed as the consultant for the venture, which would train budding lawyers in agricultural issues. She’ll oversee a committee that will determine the needs of the ag market, as well as students and employers.

Cornell says ag law is broad, but holds unique opportunities because of its depth.

Barbara Brosher / IPBS

 

The Trump administration’s new rules on birth control coverage open the door for the University of Notre Dame and other employers to stop covering contraceptives as part of their health plans. A legal battle over the changes is already brewing.

University of Notre Dame President Rev. John Jenkins is applauding the policy change, saying in a statement it reinforces religious freedom.

Matt Dine

"What happens when a fearless improviser, already a top virtuoso in the city that dominates the music world, trades his piano keyboard for a blank orchestral score?" It's the question Orpheus Chamber Orchestra is asking for their program, From Pen to Piano, this Sunday at Loeb Playhouse on the Purdue University campus. WBAA's John Clare spoke to two members of the group, violinist Renée Jolles, and bassoonist Gina Cuffari about the program and touring.

Steve J. Sherman

Andre Watts entered the music scene at age 16 when Leonard Bernstein chose him to debut with the New York Philharmonic in a national broadcasted Young People's Concerts. Just two weeks later the legenary maestro asked Andre to substitute at the last minute for an ailing Glenn Gould with the Philharmonic, launching his career in storybook fashion.

Watts joins the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra Sunday afternoon in Loeb Playhouse for Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 9. WBAA's John Clare spoke to him about the concert, about working without a conductor, and Mozart.

City of West Lafayette

As more development is planned along West Lafayette’s State Street, the city is counting the dollars it’ll reap in tax revenue and dreaming of the shiny new buildings the area will house in a couple years.

But who’s building all those gleaming new retail, apartment and office edifices? Increasingly, it looks like just a couple companies will be the primary owners.

indianapolissymphony.org

WBAA's John Clare recently spoke with Margot Marlott, cellist and Artistic Director of the Tippecanoe Chamber Music Society, and pianist Greg Kostraba about the next performance, Mozart Et Al, Sunday,October 8th at 4:00pm at Purdue University's Fowler Hall in West Lafayette.

Three lifelong friends celebrate the highs of life and help each other through the lows in this week's feature. Dubbed the "Supremes" in high school in the '60s, the female trio face one of the most difficult years yet as unforeseen circumstances shake up their lives. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

The success of Indiana’s small regional airports ebb and flow in tune with the economy. Most airports have seen downturns in business and aero tourism the past few years, but they're also reaping the benefits that come from involved local sponsors and pilots.

“A lot of times, on a Saturday morning, pilots do what we like to call ‘go out for the $100 hamburger,’” says Putnam County Regional Airport spokesman J.R. Scott.

courtesy City of Crawfordsville

The co-owner of a film company whose movie led a police officer to fire his gun at an actor in Crawfordsville says he thinks police probably acted appropriately.

Philip Demoret was also acting in the film that his company, Montgomery County Movies, was shooting at a brewery in downtown Crawfordsville.

In it, actor Jim Duff was playing the role of an armed robber. When he walked out of the brewery, he was met by officers training guns on him and ordering him to drop the air pistol he was holding.

Photo Provided

Purdue University’s enrollment of women in computer science has risen 260-percent in the last five years. Still, the program’s current freshman class is comprised of 22-percent women, which is about on par with the national rate of women in the computing field.

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