News

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 

A new bill in Congress would fast-track new affordable housing development in East Chicago.

The bill, from U.S. Rep. Todd Young (R-Ind.), aims to help more than 300 families who have to move out of the city's West Calumet Housing Complex in the next couple of months.

Students Question Gov. Candidates In Race's First Debate

Sep 28, 2016
NYC Department of Education / http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm

This week’s first gubernatorial debate, a town-hall-style event at Indianapolis’ Lawrence North High School featured questions not from a moderator, but from students, teachers and administrators.

Republican candidate Eric Holcomb, Democratic candidate John Gregg and Libertarian candidate Rex Bell faced questions on standardized testing, Indiana’s teacher shortage, youth job availability and higher education. They laid out similar policy positions on almost all issues.

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Srinivasan Chandrasekar / Purdue University

Researchers at Purdue University have found a way to fix a long-standing issue in manufacturing, where cutting a piece of metal can make its edges splinter or break apart.

They hope their solution will reap big savings in fuel and production costs.

The problem is called a shear-band. It's a deformity that occurs when a cutting machine pushes through metal, scrunching up its edges at a microscopic level.

Alex E. Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

Indiana University Health Plans, which provides insurance to approximately 23,000 Hoosiers, is the latest company to announce it won’t be offering coverage through the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2017.

Earlier this year, United Healthcare announced it was exiting Indiana’s individual marketplace, and last month, Fort Wayne-based Physicians Health Plan of Northern Indiana followed suit.

sciondriver / https://www.flickr.com/photos/minidriver/14307500816/

A Michigan senator is introducing legislation that would let urban farmers access the traditional agricultural safety net.

Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) says urban farming tactics such as community gardens and rooftop, hoop house or vertical growing are letting more people get into the business.

She told reporters on a press call Monday that she wants to make sure these farmers are included in the 2018 Farm Bill -- an omnibus package of food and agricultural policy that was last reauthorized in 2014.

accozzaglia dot ca / https://www.flickr.com/photos/aged_accozzaglia/2705768470

 

Harvest season is beginning for corn and soybeans in Indiana.

The latest USDA numbers say 74 percent of Indiana corn is mature, and 15 percent has been harvested. That's a little better than average. Soybeans are slightly behind, with 9 percent harvested as of this week.

Indiana lawmakers are exploring changes to the way money is dispersed from the state’s Military Family Relief Fund.

Debate in a study committee hearing Monday centered, in part, on whether some veterans can be “trusted” with the money.

The Military Family Relief Fund helps combat veterans and their immediate families who are struggling financially. The fund subsidizes food, housing, utility, transportation and medical bills.

Holcomb Releases Education Platform

Sep 26, 2016
Brandon Smith / IPBS

Republican gubernatorial candidate Eric Holcomb unveiled his education plan Monday during the annual meeting of Indiana school boards and local superintendents.

He proposes using a combination of  federal, state, parental and private dollars to expanding the state's preschool program.

But he stops short of seeking universal pre-k.

Holcomb also wants teachers to feel they have a say in state policy discussions.

Study Gives Indiana Poor Grade For Gender Wage Gap

Sep 26, 2016
Keith Cooper / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cooperweb/8363160192

A new study ranks Indiana near the bottom  when it comes to gender pay equality. 

An American Association of University Women study finds Indiana women on average earn only about three-quarters of what their male counterparts do.

The study cites weak state laws as part of the reason Indiana ranks 40th out of the 50 states.

Indiana Institute for Working Families policy analyst Erin Macey says a Cornell University study showed women are often penalized just for being mothers.

Claire McInerny/Indiana Public Broadcasting

Latasha Marshall waits for a cab. She sits in the lobby of a Hilton Garden Inn, which serves as her living room this week.

The Environmental Protection Agency put her up for the week so the agency can deep clean her home; it tested for high levels of lead.

"The other night when we first got here, I went to sleep and I woke up and I was at ease,” Marshall says. “I haven’t been sleeping like that at home."

Once it’s clean, she can return with her daughters, ages 11, 16 and 17, but not to stay.

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