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At this weekend's U.S. Conference of Mayors in Indianapolis, leaders from cities big and small are brainstorming ways to collaborate on economic growth, rather than competing.

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg says that approach is already catching on in Indiana.

Outside a session with the mayors of Boston and New York, Buttigieg said his city of 100,000 is just big enough to have all the problems of a major metro area:

 

Wikimedia Commons

A federal trade board has sided with the American steel industry this week, ruling that China harmed U.S. companies with unfair business practices.

But, U.S. steelmakers won't get the all-out ban on Chinese imports they requested.

The ruling is a victory for Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel, which asked the International Trade Commission to recommend a ban on Chinese steel earlier this year.

Brandon Smith

Hundreds of America’s mayors are in Indiana this weekend for the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ annual conference.

They’re calling for Congress and the presidential candidates to support the nation’s cities.

Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake leads the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Kicking off the group’s annual meeting, she emphasized the importance of metropolitan hubs to the nation’s economy.

Iker Merodio / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ikermerodio/4673992149

A Purdue University economist says he doesn’t think Indiana will feel much of an impact after voters in the United Kingdom elected to leave the European Union.

Jerry Lynch is a former interim dean of Purdue’s Krannert School of Management and says the state and its businesses will have to take a wait-and-see approach.

“It’s not going to be dire," Lynch says. "It has the potential, depending on the kind of agreements that get negotiated, of slowing down world growth in the economy. And if world growth slows down, Indiana is affected by it, there’s no question at all.”

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

As if there aren’t enough orange construction barrels on Indiana roads, drivers should brace for more.

Repairing roads was the priority this year when state lawmakers voted to return local income tax dollars to cities, towns and counties across the state.

How The Cash Can Be Spent

Seventy-five percent of the money must be spent on roads.

Lawmakers allowed local governments to spend the remaining quarter of the money they’re getting back on a non-road project or to put it away for future use.

  Ebola may seem like a disease of the past, but the outbreak that struck much of Africa happened only a few years ago. Zika virus seems to be at the forefront today, but many parallels between the two diseases can be made in the way we treat, support, and remember those who are struck with them. Lafayette native Richard Mertens, a nurse, recalls his experiences in Ebola Safari when he traveled to Sierra Leone to care for Ebola-stricken patients. Accounts of patient interactions, compassion, and the hardship of the medical field are captured in his many anecdotal chapters.

Chris Morisse Vizza

The 1,500 residents of Brookston spent Thursday without power, due to strong winds that felled dozens of trees and damaged buildings.

Most everyone in town, and on the outskirts, mentioned the sound of the wind that arrived with a storm just after midnight Thursday morning.

“I’ve never seen the wind like that last night,” Ken Lucas says. “That was just unbelievable.”

The hum of generators replaced the wind, as residents, including Lucas emerged from their houses and saw the damage.

ECP / https://www.flickr.com/photos/shamanic-shift/

A Kentucky man is facing the rare charge of timber theft in Indiana, which could land him up to 10 months in prison.

Cheyenne Allen of Salyersville, Kentucky, is facing federal charges after being caught in an illegal timber scheme.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources and the US Attorney’s Office worked together on the case, which is the first time someone has been charged for timber theft in Indiana.

David Shank / Shank Public Relations Counselors

A new report from the Indiana Chamber of Commerce shows school superintendents and principals have favorable views of school counselors.

But those same officials say they can’t always hire counselors when students need them.

School counselors help students improve their academics, address emotional needs and prepare for college and careers … but they aren’t always there.

IU, Purdue Applaud SCOTUS Affirmative Action Ruling

Jun 23, 2016
Owen Parrish / https://www.flickr.com/photos/oparrish/3601673876

Indiana universities applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold the University of Texas’ affirmative action policies. The 4-3 ruling maintains affirmative action policies already at Indiana colleges.  

At stake was whether the University of Texas could consider race as one of several factors for acceptance.

Abigail Fisher sued the university after being denied admission … claiming she was discriminated against because she’s white. She says other, less qualified students were admitted because of affirmative action.

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