News

Shuhua Yue / Purdue University image

More than 1 million people in the United States will get cancer this year, and doctors are treating a growing number of these patients with immunotherapy,  a method that works a lot like a vaccine. 

About 30 different immunotherapy medicines are FDA approved, a majority of them in just the last four years.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan reports on work being done in Indiana to help develop this emerging treatment.

Chris Morisse Vizza

The extreme cold temperatures on Wednesday provided members of Purdue’s Muslim Student Association an opportunity to warm relations with the community.

The students offered free coffee and donuts to all who passed by the Islamic Society of Greater Lafayette.

Outreach Director Enosh Kazem, a West Lafayette native and Purdue food science graduate student, organized the “Meet a Muslim” event.

Book Review: The Geography of Genius

10 hours ago

  The term "genius" has been thrown around a lot in recent times. People are culinary geniuses, or technology geniuses, or instrumental geniuses. But how have geniuses come to congregate over history? Have we nurtured a world where more geniuses exist? Author Eric Weiner investigates this theory by visiting and researching cities known throughout history for their accumulation of intelligence. Dating all the way back to Athens and jumping forward to Silicon Valley, Weiner attempts to discover the connection between geniuses then and geniuses now.

The State Street Project / http://statestreetwl.com/

With the broad strokes of West Lafayette and Purdue University’s State Street Project settled, residents Thursday night delved into the nitty-gritty details of the Plenary Roads plan for the project.

Each of the approximately one-dozen speakers at a public hearing was largely complimentary of the plan.

However, one of the few areas of disagreement was the plan’s suggestion to convert many one-way roads into two-way streets.

Purdue Fire Chief Kevin Ply, though, calls the measure a win for public safety.

Randy McRoberts / https://www.flickr.com/photos/rmcrob/

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources’ newly-revised strategic forestry plan doesn’t include any significant changes to the amount of timber cut by the Indiana agency, but does include plans to make forests more accessible to Hoosiers looking to pitch a tent or explore a cave.

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