News

Rachel Elaine / https://www.flickr.com/photos/46434953@N07/9529996261/

The Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority is exploring ways to drive down housing and transportation costs, pairing with an Indiana-based energy technology consortium to try to craft energy efficiency solutions.

The IHCDA’s goal for low and middle-income Hoosiers is to ensure their housing and transportation costs don’t take up more than 45 percent of the household budget.

Rose-Hulman Sets Record Number Of Female Students

Aug 28, 2015
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology / http://www.rose-hulman.edu/offices-and-services/student-life.aspx

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology says the 20th anniversary of co-education at the school is being marked by a record number of female students this year.

Rose-Hulman says this year's incoming freshman class has 133 female students, which is a school record and represents one-quarter of the class.

Vice President For Enrollment Management and Strategic communications James Goecker says the school is increasing diversity in its student body, "with 30 percent of the 2015-16 freshman class of 547 being non-Caucasian, non-American citizen."

President Obama reestablished diplomatic relations with Cuba in 2014, and Americans can now travel to this once-forbidden Caribbean island. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has a review for the moon travel guide to Cuba for those who want to take advantage of the nation's re-opening.  

Leigh DeNoon / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Just how long has Doris Myers been painting? Here's how she put it to the crowd of former students and admirers at the opening of her “Retrospective: 1930 to Present”:

“My first oil painting I did in my freshman year in 1935," Myers says. "Oh, do your math! It was a long time ago.”

At 93, Myers is one of Indiana's oldest working artists. She was born in November of 1921, just a year after women got the right to vote. She knew at a young age that she wanted to be an artist.

  Rock as a music genre has been defying social norms for quite some time, but only now has a woman done the same in the world of rock criticism. Jessica Hopper examines artists like Miley Cyrus, Riot Grrrl, and Nirvana, giving her honest thoughts on their contributions to rock culture. Her book, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, gathers her various published pieces and groups them into themes such as "Strictly Business", "Bad Reviews", and "Nostalgia", giving a holistic view of today's changing world of rock.

EAB stump
Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

Good news for tree huggers in Indiana—experts say while tree deaths caused by the invasive Emerald Ash Borer are at their peak, it’s likely the number of infestations will decline in the next few years.

For the past decade, the little beetle has been a big problem for the country’s trees. The ash borer burrows into a tree’s trunk, destroying the tissues and pathways that carry nutrients.

John Meyers Pedestrian Bridge
Sarah Fentem / WBAA

This year’s Beers Across the Wabash might better be referred to as “Beers Next ToThe Wabash.” Construction on the event’s usual home on the John T. Meyers Pedestrian Bridge is behind schedule and won’t be done for at least another two weeks – thus moving the festival into neighboring Riehle Plaza.

Lafayette Public Works Director Jennifer Leshney says the bridge was originally slated to open August 28, but is behind schedule thanks to what she refers to as a “railing delivery issue.” Leshney says the railings weren’t delivered in time but didn't offer any more information.

Kenneth Spencer / https://www.flickr.com/photos/kendo26/5606710714

Crawfordsville’s mayor is organizing an informal social media campaign to put pressure on railroad operator CSX to pay more attention to the city.

Mayor Todd Barton, speaking Thursday on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, encouraged Crawfordsville residents to phone CSX to complain about trains clogging intersections in the city.

But he says the idea of an angry phone call may be passé.

Scott / https://www.flickr.com/photos/skippy/

The Indiana Supreme Court will consider the future of Indiana’s personalized license plates after the state and the ACLU each had their say over a lawsuit challenging the program.

Greenfield Police Officer Rodney Vawter, with approval from the Fraternal Order of Police, had a license plate that read “0INK.” 

The Bureau of Motor Vehicles revoked it, calling it inappropriate.  The ACLU of Indiana, on behalf of Vawter, sued the BMV, saying its policy violates free speech rights. 

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

There’s an argument to be made that getting the Stellar Communities designation was the easy part for Crawfordsville Mayor Todd Barton.

This week on Ask The Mayor, we’ll find out from him whether the toughest parts – gathering money and implementing an ambitious plan -- are yet to come, and whether that puts significantly more pressure on him to deliver meaningful change during his second term in office.

VIEVU / http://www.vievu.com/

Indiana law enforcement and municipal officials caution lawmakers Wednesday against a broad policy of releasing police body camera videos to the public, citing both privacy and due process concerns. 

Indiana’s public access law doesn’t specifically mention police body camera footage.  But it does have what’s called an “investigatory record” exception – meaning that law enforcement can indefinitely withhold information if it’s involved in an investigation, even after the investigation is over.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A series of texts to the Purdue community Saturday warning people of a suspicious package, an armed robbery and a sexual assault raised many an eyebrow. But when only one of those situations was updated with follow-up texts, some questioned how Purdue’s warning system is designed.

Purdue University

Mitch Daniels has tried to make his time as Purdue President about student affordability – so this month in our regular conversation with him, we ask about the plans from three people who’d also like to be president – of the United States.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the former Republican governor doesn’t have rave reviews for education savings plans from the top three contenders for the 2016 Democratic nomination.

Farmers Say New EPA Water Proposals Unfairly Target Them

Aug 26, 2015
Ron Nichols/NRCS

Most people agree clean rivers and streams are vital to our health. The divide comes when the conversation turns to who should make sure those waterways are kept clean, who should regulate them and whether they should be regulated at all.

Later this month, the Environmental Protection Agency plans to implement a new set of rules that expands its reach -- allowing it to regulate not only major rivers, but also the tributaries that flow into them.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

Just one year after Indiana’s comprehensive criminal code overhaul took effect, the Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council wants to increase drug dealing penalties. 

Indiana’s criminal code reform, which took five years to craft, was aimed largely at reducing penalties for low-level, nonviolent drug offenses in an effort to focus more on treatment and reduce recidivism. 

But a year into that reform, Prosecuting Attorneys Council head David Powell says he wants to add more teeth to the state’s drug dealing sentences.

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